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CfP: Recovering & Uncovering the Past of Diverse Communities in Imperial Spaces: Memory and Self-Organization in Urban Centres of the Eastern European and Ottoman Realms

2 months 1 week ago
The Orient-Institut Istanbul and the Georgia Branch Office of the Max Weber Foundation in Tbilisi are jointly organizing a two-day workshop on the everyday life of urban communities in minority position in imperial pasts; on their memory and heritage.

Recovering & Uncovering the Past of Diverse Communities in Imperial Spaces: Memory and Self-Organization in Urban Centres of the Eastern European and Ottoman Realms

The Orient-Institut Istanbul and the Georgia Branch Office of the Max Weber Foundation in Tbilisi are jointly organizing a two-day workshop on the everyday life of urban communities in minority position in imperial pasts; on their memory and heritage. We intend to bring together historians and anthropologists to present diverse experiences of ethnic and religious communities in the cities of the Russian and Ottoman empires. Of particular interest to us are the history of the institutions that these communities created to function within the city, their ethnic and religious infrastructure, forms of agency, and their representation in private memory. A separate section shall be devoted to the past of communities no longer present today that nevertheless once played a pronounced role in urban life and whose cultural, artistic, and architectural heritage is still being appreciated and conceptualized both by contemporary residents and outside observers. We encourage an anthropological as well as a historical approach to the study of the past and presence of historical minority communities of imperial cities, while being open to a wide array of different approaches and methodologies employed in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Dates: 12-13 September 2024
Location: Tbilisi, Georgia
Type: in person
Conference language: English

Acceptance decisions will be made by the beginning of March 2024.

Send please your submissions (paper proposal of ca. 300 words and your CV) to the following address by 16 February 2024: info@mws-georgia.mws.

Kontakt

info@mws-georgia.mws

https://mwsgeorgia.hypotheses.org/1799

CfA Counting Work and Workers in Colonial and Post-Colonial Africa

2 months 1 week ago

CALL FOR ARTICLES – SPECIAL ISSUE
International Labor and Working-Class History
“Counting Work and Workers in Colonial and Post-Colonial Africa”

Editors:
Chikouna Cissé, Annick Lacroix, Baptiste Mollard, Laure Piguet, Léa Renard
This project stems from the collective discussions initiated by the French ANR program “Cocole - Compter aux colonies” coordinated by Béatrice Touchelay (https://chiffrempire.hypotheses.org/).

Socio-economic statistics in African countries have recently come under severe attack. In a widely debated book published in 2013, M. Jerven did not hesitate to describe the data used to produce these numbers as “poor”.[2] The statistical systems these indicators are drawn from find their roots in the dissemination of Western models and categories described as modern during the colonial period. Socio-economic statistics are also linked to the practices of nascent international organizations that developed at the same time.[3] While the Yearbook of Labour Statistics published by the International Labour Organization (ILO) has sought, for instance, to gather data on working conditions “for each country”[4] since 1936, this organization has failed to describe the world of work in all its diversity, notably because women and men workers from colonized areas were very rarely included before the 1950s, apart from white urban workers. Such an absence can be accounted for both by the hierarchical representation of populations that is core to the colonial project and by the tradition of labor statistics, which were historically closely linked to the wage-earner’s status as a standard model and the development of labor law (mostly with regard to industrial work).[5]

Despite the fragmented nature of these numbers, censuses and surveys were regularly carried out during the colonial and post-colonial periods to measure labor or to estimate the labor force on the African continent. Drawing on sources like censuses by occupational category, company statistics and quantitative observations conducted by labor inspectors, this special issue seeks to take into account the wide and varied range of practices and to examine the shifting representations of labor and workers in Africa in the longue durée. How do political and organizational contexts, marked by the limited resources and staff dedicated to the statistical apparatus, or the fiscal agenda of censuses, influence the production of numbers?[6] And how do these numbers contribute, in return, to the repressive, racist or managerial logics of exploiting these populations as mere resources?[7] What dimensions of the labor world were measured during the colonial period and what dimensions were ignored?

While demographic statistics have been widely studied,[8] the measurement and numerical representations of work in Africa remains a field of research yet to be investigated. The point of this special issue is not to assess the reliability of the produced data, but rather to question practices of counting work in different African contexts during the colonial and post-independence periods from the perspective of the historical sociology of quantification.[9] Drawing on recent developments in this field of research,[10] it will examine data production as a dynamic and multi-scalar process, at the intersection between individuals, local political structures, colonial bureaucracies and international organizations. The contributions in this issue move away from the premise of statistics as top-down tools of imperial domination.[11] Particular attention will be given to the financial and human resources allocated, as well as to the nomenclatures used to estimate the available workforce or to identify changes in labor practices. The aim is both to shed light on how diverse colonial situations (French, British, Portuguese or others) shaped the production of numbers and to sketch out comparisons across the African continent.

This special issue also examines the way quantification practices and data on work and workers as well as the categories used to classify workers or economic sectors were inherited or transformed by the administrations of independent states after decolonization. We therefore heartily welcome contributions that document the production of numbers at the time of the initial social policies in the 1960s, the role played by “technical cooperation” in training national statisticians or the circulation of “best practices” in the course of the Structural Adjustment Programs from the 1980s onward.
 
The proposed articles might address one or more of the following topics:

(1) The production of numbers on work and workers: Opening the black box
We welcome propositions that focus on the actors involved in the process of compiling numbers, data collection procedures and survey materiality (e.g., detailed written reports, statistical tables or standardized forms). Articles might explore the hypothesis of a tendency toward bureaucratization and standardization, which started as early on as in the colonial period, was supported by international organizations, and continued in different ways after independence.[12] We are particularly interested in contributions that include statistics produced by non-state actors (e.g. local religious authorities, missionaries, trade unions, companies); or that try to capture co-construction dynamics and conflicts between state and non-state actors, as well as between private and public numbers.[13] For both the colonial and post-independence periods, contributions highlighting the role of international organizations in the production of an international framework for counting and observing work in Africa will also be highly welcome.

(2) Why counting?
This special issue seeks to highlight the diversity of usages and motivations for the production of numbers, thereby also pointing to power asymmetries between bureaucracies and the populations they count. The transformation of indigenous people into a colonial labor force seems to have been one of the main reasons for keeping quantitative accounts.[14] One other motive might have been colonial authorities’ desire to control mobility toward cities, neighboring colonies or Europe.[15] From the 1940s onward, surveying working conditions and developing labor and social rights became more prominent, and indigenous workers started to be (partly) included into this framework (e.g., with regard to the supervision and restriction of child labor, or the regulation of industrial accidents).[16] One possible question here would be whether (and if so, how) statistics have been used as the performative manifestation of a stable power, thereby revealing its precariousness. In cases where data is missing, how to explain that public servants resisted measuring, whereas counting was at the same time a solid component of bureaucratic functioning in other parts of the world? To what extent was the manufacturing of statistical tables used as bureaucratic tools of reporting, rather than as instruments of knowledge to inform on populations and work?[17] The aim here is to initiate a reflection on the precariousness of bureaucratic apparatuses, the role of ignorance, the assumption of modernity that was at the core of these practices, and the legitimization of the political projects they promoted, even after independence.

(3) Categorization in practice
The cognitive operation of quantification enables governments to confer legibility[18] or “calculability”[19] to the societies and economies they govern. Counting makes it thus possible to standardize heterogeneous environments and social worlds. When adapting to our object of inquiry the conclusions drawn from the historical literature on state techniques, we assume that labor statistics disseminate abstract models to portray reality and act on it, while at the same time reducing uncertainty and facilitating decision-making by authorities. From this perspective, articles might examine the ways workers were categorized in colonized, and later in independent, Africa. The culturalist and racist dimensions of the adopted categorizations (linked, for example, to the anxiety provoked by an imagined “detribalized” proletariat or increasingly numerous unemployed persons in urban areas), the focus on wage employment, and the difficulty of grasping other forms of work, in particular female domestic work or the so-called informal sector,[20] are all dimensions that could be addressed by the proposed articles.
 
***

This special issue aims to test these research hypotheses (and others still to be formulated) on a variety of fields, using empirical case studies. Particular attention will be paid to proposals originality and to the use of new (or alternative) primary sources. We see the writing and publishing process as a way of initiating a dialogue between history and social sciences on these questions. To ensure the coherence of the special issue, the authors of the selected proposals will be invited to an authors’ workshop (to be held in Spring 2024 in hybrid format).
 
Please submit article abstracts (no longer than 500 words) until 9 January 2024.
Contact: laure.piguet@unifr.ch

Tentative schedule:
Deadline for abstract submission: 9 January 2024
Notifications on acceptance by editors: 1 February 2024
Authors workshop: Fall 2024
Submission of articles for peer review: February 2025
Final submission: Fall 2025

[2] Morten Jerven, Poor Numbers: How We Are Misled by African Development Statistics and What to Do about It. (London, 2013); Abel Kinyondo, Riccardo Pelizzo, “Poor Quality of Data in Africa: What Are the Issues?,” Politics & Policy, 46 (6, 2018): 851-877; Oasis Kodila-Tedika, “Pauvreté de chiffres : explication de la tragédie statistique africaine”, MPRA Paper N° 43734 (2013).
[3] Martin Bemmann, Weltwirtschaftsstatistik. Internationale Wirtschaftsstatistik und die Geschichte der Globalisierung, 1850-1950 (Berlin, Boston, 2023).
[4] International Labor Office, The ILO Year-Book, 1934-1935, (Vol. II: Labor Statistics) (Geneva, 1935), iii.
[5] Andreas Eckert, “Wage labour,” General Labour History of Africa. Workers, Employers and Governments, 20th-21st Centuries, ed. Stefano Bellucci and Andreas Eckert (Woodbridge/Rochester, 2019), 17-44; Alain Supiot, Critique du droit du travail (Paris, 1994), 190.
[6] The connection between census and taxation had drastic consequences on population movements, and ultimately on census data. In the Ivory Coast, in order to escape the tax burden, northern populations chose to move to the neighboring colonies of French Sudan and Upper Volta, thereby disrupting the data needed to define taxable population. See Kimba A. Idrissa, “L’impôt de capitation: les abus du régime de surtaxation et la résistance des populations,” African Economic History 21 (1993): 97-111 ; Chikouna Cissé, “Révoltes fiscales, affrontements et circulations en AOF : l’insurrection de 1902-1903 en pays Pallaka (Nord Côte d’Ivoire),” Locus: revista de história 18 (2, 2013):143-158.
[7] A report by Bernard Sol, French colonial inspector, showed that the fiction of an unlimited labor force in Upper Volta had been statistically inflated to justify forced recruitment practices in Mossi country. See Raymond Gervais and Issiaka Mandé, “Sol et l’abolition de la Haute-Volta : mythes ou réalités,” La reconstitution de la Haute-Volta, ed. Willy Moussa Bantenga et al. (Ouagadougou, 2010), 243-268.
[8] See for instance: Kamel Kateb, Européens, “indigènes” et juifs en Algérie (1830-1962): Représentations et réalités des populations, (Paris, 2001); Raymond R. Gervais and Issiaka Mandé, “Comment compter les sujets de l’Empire ? Les étapes d’une démographie impériale en AOF avant 1946,” Vingtième Siècle. Revue d’histoire 95 (3, 2007): 63-74.
[9] Alain Desrosières, Pour une sociologie historique de la quantification. L’argument statistique I, (Paris, 2008); Wendy N. Espeland and Mitchell L. Stevens, “A Sociology of Quantification,” European Journal of Sociology 49 (3, 2008): 401-436.
[10] Ram Bhagat, “Census and Caste Enumeration: British Legacy and Contemporary Practice in India,” Genus 62 (2, 2006): 119-134; Pierre Karila-Cohen, “État et enquête au XIXe siècle : d’une autorité à l’autre,” Romantisme 149 (3, 2010): 25-37; Morgane Labbé, La nationalité, une histoire de chiffres. Politique et statistiques en Europe centrale (1848-1919) (Paris, 2019); Tom Crook and Glen O’Hara (eds.), Statistics and the Public Sphere. Numbers and the People in Modern Britain, c. 1800-2000 (New York, London 2011); Lawrence Goldman, Victorians & Numbers. Statistics and Society in Nineteenth Century Britain (Oxford, 2022).
[11] Umamaheswaran Kalpagam, Rule by Numbers. Governmentality in Colonial India (Lanham, Boulder, 2014).
[12] Thomas Bierschenk and Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, States at Work: Dynamics of African Bureaucracies (Leiden, Boston, 2014); Séverine Awenengo Dalberto and Richard Banégas (eds.), “Citoyens de papier en Afrique”, special issue Genèses, 112 (3, 2018).
[13] Fabien Cardoni, Anne Conchon, Michel Margairaz, and Béatrice Touchelay (eds.), Chiffres privés, chiffres publics, XVIIe-XXIe siècle. Entre hybridations et conflits (Rennes, 2022).
[14] Léa Renard, Socio-histoire de l’observation statistique de l’altérité Principes de classification coloniale, nationale et migratoire en France et en Allemagne (1880-2010) (PhD thesis, Potsdam, Grenoble, 2019), 403-410.
[15] Daouda Gary-Tounkara, Migrants soudanais-maliens et conscience ivoirienne, (Paris, 2008) ; Darshan Vigneswaran and Joel Quirk (eds.), Mobility Makes States: Migration and Power in Africa (Philadelphia, 2015).
[16] Frederick Cooper, Decolonization and African Society. The Labor Question in French and British Africa (Cambridge, 1996); Ben Scully and Rana Jawad, “Social Welfare,” General Labour History of Africa. Workers, Employers and Governments, 20th-21st Centuries, ed. Stefano Bellucci and Andreas Eckert (Woodbridge/Rochester, 2019), 553-583.
[17] Romain Tiquet, “Rendre compte pour ne pas avoir à rendre des comptes,” Cahiers d’histoire. Revue d’histoire critique, 137 (2017): 123-140.
[18] James C. Scott, Seeing like a State (New Haven, Conn., 1999).
[19] Timothy Mitchell, Rule of Experts: Egypt, Techno-Politics, Modernity (Berkeley, 2002).
[20] Franco Barchiesi, “Precarious and Informal Labour,” General Labour History of Africa. Workers, Employers and Governments, 20th-21st Centuries, ed. Stefano Bellucci and Andreas Eckert (Woodbridge/Rochester, 2019), 44-75; Aaron Benanav, “The Origins of Informality: The ILO at the Limit of the Concept of Unemployment,” Journal of Global History, 14 (1, 2019), 107-125; Nicola Schalkowski and Marianne Braig, “Informal Work,” Shifting Categories of Work. Unsettling the Ways We Think about Jobs, Labor, and Activities, ed. by Lisa Herzog and Bénédicte Zimmermann (New York, 2022), 119-133.

CfP: Victimhood - Acknowledgement - Politics of Memory: Struggling over the Memory of Suffering

2 months 1 week ago

Conference in Dresden, 03.09.2024 - 05.09.2024

The second half of the twentieth century saw a change in the concept of victimhood in post-socialist and post-conflict countries. Although victims are often perceived through the prism of their trauma and passivity, attention is currently focused also on their active role in transitional justice and their social mobilization.

CfP: Victimhood - Acknowledgement - Politics of Memory: Struggling over the Memory of Suffering

The second half of the twentieth century saw a change in the concept of victimhood in post-socialist and post-conflict countries. Although victims are often perceived through the prism of their trauma and passivity, attention is currently focused also on their active role in transitional justice and their social mobilization. It turns out that victims and their organizations have been playing an important role in the democratic transition and in public history and appeared on the political scene as distinct and powerful groups that managed to achieve some of their main goals, such as compensations, rehabilitations, redress and acknowledgment. Representatives of victim associations (especially former political prisoners and their offspring) have also turned into ‘guardians of memory’. Their role is to share their experience and simultaneously defend the image of the group and the association. Their main goal is not only to integrate the history of the victims and survivors of the state socialist dictatorship into broader political and national history, but to enforce their version of the past as the dominant narrative as well.

The aim of the interdisciplinary conference is to focus on victim associations in post-socialist countries in East-Central and East-Southern Europe. The conference will focus on the role that victim organizations (of political prisoners, victims of the repression of state socialism) played after 1989, what were their goals and through which activities they wanted to achieve recognition and redress. The conference aims to explore these organizations as participants in public life and the formation and maintenance of collective memory, as well as how these associations sought to emphasize and use or promote their collective memory and their interpretation of history in the political process and contribute to the democratization of society.

In recent years, academics from various disciplines have contributed to a growing body of literature on victimhood. Together, these studies analyse the concept of victimhood in different geographical and historical contexts. This conference seeks to bring together scholars from various academic disciplines (history, psychology, sociology, political science and anthropology) who examine aspects of victimhood, victim organizations, victim trauma, victim politics and transitional justice in post-socialist countries. We propose to follow three broad tracks in order to identify how victimhood was shaped and how the victims and their organizations engaged in political action to demand redress and acknowledgement. We are also interested in the consequences of the construction of victimhood in democratic transitions, both positive and negative. The major themes of this conference are:

1. Victimhood as a social construct
We consider victimhood to be a socially and politically constructed category and characterize victimhood as a form of collective identity based on harm caused by an individual, group or state. Therefore, our aim is to focus on the questions of how and why some people transform their trauma into a collective identity. Because victimhood is not only a moral and legislative matter, but also to a significant extent a political one, we want to study how the political and social context shaped the narratives of victims and influenced the form of victimhood. We are also interested in questions such as how do the victims define themselves and why did some victim groups receive the status of victims and obtained political and social acknowledgement and various advantages, while other groups did not. In this context, the crucial factor in some countries seems to be whether they engaged in competition or cooperation with organizations of Nazi victims. How did they define themselves in relation to them and how did it affect their identity?

2. The role of victims in transitional justice and democratization
As various studies have shown, victim organizations adopt different strategies and become active political actors. We are interested in the roles that victims and their organizations played in transitional justice. In this regard, we would like to explore how victims shaped the course of democratization, their involvement in the legislative process, their strategies and objectives. How did they influence the legislative changes regarding rehabilitation, restitution, compensation and recognition? We are also interested in victim associations as participants in public life and the formation and maintenance of collective memory, as well as how these associations tried to emphasise and utilise or promote their collective memory and interpretation of history in the political and educational process.

3. Shadows of victimhood
While the victim organizations are rightly understood as legitimate representatives of victims and their claims, their influence on democratic political developments can be controversial. Their activities on the one hand helped societies cope with their difficult past, but on the other brought to public space a polarized narrative that was not limited to members of the Communist Party, but often applied to ethnic, religious and sexual minority groups as well. In recent years, it has been noted that some of the politically persecuted and former political prisoners are gradually shifting towards right-wing extremism. Victims and their organizations tend to present their statements from a position of moral superiority, and see any condemnation of their views as belittling their experience and relativizing their suffering. The conference aims to better understand how did the narratives of victimhood in various post-socialist countries exacerbate affective polarization.

We encourage interested speakers to tackle the following questions:
- How do the victims define themselves and how does this definition become part of their identity? Do they define themselves as victims, or as heroes and fighters against the communist dictatorship?
- What means did the victim organizations use to achieve their goals of compensation, redress and recognition?
- What role did the victim organizations play in the democratization process and how did they transform the way societies understand justice, memory and reconciliation?
- In what ways do victim organizations seek to institutionalize a specific narrative of the past and thus promote their collective memory and interpretation of history in the political and educational process?
- How did the victim narrative develop, to what extent and why was it polarized? And how was the polarized narrative and value system transferred to society and what was the degree of its success? Why do some members of victim organizations cooperate with politicians from extremist right-wing parties?

Proposals Proposals of 300–500 words, accompanied by a short biographical note, should be sent by January 30, 2024 to the following addresses: klara.pinerova@mailbox.tu-dresden.de. As we plan to have commentaries for each session, papers of 2,000 words are required to be pre-circulated by August 1, 2024.

Decisions will be announced no later than February 28, 2024.

Funding is limited to people from Europe, but we are open to participants from other non-European countries and are offering the option to participate remotely.

Organised by: Hannah Arendt Institute for Totalitarianism Studies at TU Dresden (HAIT) German Historical Institute Warsaw (DHIW) – Prague Branch Institute of Contemporary History of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (ÚSD)

Contact: klara.pinerova@mailbox.tu-dresden.de

Kontakt

klara.pinerova@mailbox.tu-dresden.de

http://www.hait.tu-dresden.de

Queer Urban Underworlds in European State Socialism

2 months 1 week ago

Workshop Date: September 17 to September 19, 2024 (Prague)

We are excited to announce a call for papers for a workshop to form a collaborative and interdisciplinary team. The workshop's primary goal is to collectively prepare a panel submission for the ASEEES (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies) conference in 2025 while concurrently working on a collective monograph for a distinguished publication thematic series.

Queer Urban Underworlds in European State Socialism

Concept:
The workshop aims to explore the living worlds and underworlds of state socialist cities, focusing on gendering and queering current research on the urban history of Eastern Europe under state socialism. It draws inspiration from the intricate dynamics of "living worlds" and "underworlds" within the urban landscape of state socialist cities in Eastern Europe. Stemming from exploring urban spaces as manifestations of societal power structures, the concept of "underworlds" goes beyond the physical confines beneath the city's surface, encapsulating hidden facets of urban life. Reflecting prevailing values and ideas regarding societal organization, these "underworlds" serve as fields of power marked by the indelible signs of social inequalities and the majority's dominance.
This nuanced understanding becomes the foundation for probing into the gendered and queer dimensions of state socialist cities, offering insight into the intricate complexities of urban life during this era. As we delve into these hidden realms, we aim to unravel the interplay between those in control and those under control, shedding light on the obscured facets of urban life and exploring unique strategies urban actors develop in adapting public spaces to their goals. Through this collective exploration, we seek to contribute significantly to the evolving narrative of Eastern European urban history.

Themes:
We invite submissions from various disciplines that explore the intersections of gender and queerness within the urban history of Eastern Europe during the state socialist era, i.e., of the so-called Eastern Bloc outside the Soviet Union from 1947 to 1991.
At the same time, the main emphasis of the contributions should be on the period of late socialism, its possible connections, continuities, and discontinuities with the subsequent post-socialist transformation.
Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
1. Gendered and queer spaces in state socialist cities.
2. Gendered everyday life and queer experiences in connection to the diversity of urban populations
3. Gender and queer aspects of subcultures, countercultures, and resistance movements.
4. Architectural and spatial implications of state socialism on gender and queerness.
5. Historical perspectives on the LGBTQ+ community in Eastern European cities.

Goals:
1. ASEEES Panel Submission: Develop a comprehensive and engaging panel proposal for presentation at the ASEEES 2025 Convention (Thursday, November 20 - Sunday, November 23, 2025, Washington, DC), fostering dialogue and intellectual exchange.

2. Collective Monograph: Collaborate on designing and crafting a thematic monograph for submission to prestigious publishers that will introduce gender and queerness into the urban history of the Eastern Bloc state socialist dictatorships.

Important Information:
Venue: Prague, Czech Republic, EU
The organizer provides all selected active participants with accommodation for two nights.
Reimbursement of travel expenses is possible. Specify the request in the application.

Submission Guidelines:
We invite interested participants to submit abstracts (250-300 words) and a brief bio (150 words) by February 18, 2024.
Please send your proposals to QWPrague2024@gmail.com

Important Dates:
Submission Deadline: February 18, 2024
Notification of Acceptance: March 22, 2024
Submission of Papers: August 15, 2024
Workshop Date: September 17 to September 19, 2024

We welcome submissions from scholars, researchers, and practitioners across disciplines passionate about unraveling the multifaceted history of state socialist cities in Eastern Europe.
Join us in this collaborative venture to explore the Living Worlds and Underworlds of State Socialist Cities, contributing to the gendering and queering of Eastern European urban history.

Jaromír Mrňka, German Historical Institute Warsaw, Prague Branch
Adéla Gjuričová, Institute for Contemporary History, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague
Ladislav Jackson, Society for Queer Memory, Prague
Věra Sokolová, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University, Prague

1. ASEEES Panel Submission: Develop a comprehensive and engaging panel proposal for presentation at the ASEEES 2025 Convention (Thursday, November 20 - Sunday, November 23, 2025, Washington, DC), fostering dialogue and intellectual exchange.

2. Collective Monograph: Collaborate on designing and crafting a thematic monograph for submission to prestigious publishers that will introduce gender and queerness into the urban history of the Eastern Bloc state socialist dictatorships.

Kontakt

QWPrague2024@gmail.com

The Forensics of Provenance. Colonial Translocations Through the Lenses of Legal Pluralism

2 months 1 week ago

There is a broad public debate on the restitution of objects with colonial or imperial provenance.However, political and legal debates often disregard the normative understanding and the legal imagination of communities of origin related to these objects. The workshop addresses this issue by providing a common conceptual and disciplinary framework for understanding the embeddedness of material culture in a plurality of legal orders and normative systems.

The Forensics of Provenance: Colonial Translocations Through the Lenses of Legal Pluralism

There is a broad public debate on the restitution of objects with colonial or imperial provenance. However, political and legal debates often disregard the normative understanding and the legal imagination of communities of origin related to these objects. The workshop addresses this issue by providing a common conceptual and disciplinary framework for understanding the embeddedness of material culture in a plurality of legal orders and normative systems. Through interdisciplinary theoretical groundwork, conceptual reflection, and illustrative case studies, its participants fill this lacuna and suggest new research methodologies and legal remedies useful for policymakers, legal scholars, and heritage professionals.

Programm

Thursday, 8 February 2024

9.00–9.30
EViR Directors (Münster), Sebastian M. Spitra (Vienna) & João Figueiredo (Münster): Opening of the Workshop and Welcome

9.30–10.30
Keynote: Paul Basu (Oxford): Pluriversal Museology and the forensis of Provenance

10.30–11.00
Coffee break

Section 1: Constellations of Normative Knowledge
Chair: Franziska Dübgen (Münster)

11.00–11.45
Lucas Lixinski (Sydney): Asking Better Provenance Questions? Cultural Heritage, Legal Pluralism, and the “Other”

11.45–12.30
Carsten Stahn (Leiden): Confronting Colonial Objects. Histories, Legalities, and Access to Culture

12.30–14.00
Lunch break

Section 2: Constructing Provenance. Historical Institutions and the Law
Chair: Benjamin Seebröker (Münster)

14.00–14.45
Eva Künkler (Hannover): Colonial Collections and the Translocation of Objects: The Long Duration of German Debates on Ownership and Heritage

14.45–15.30
Sebastian Willert (Leipzig): The Forensics of Colonial Archaeology: The Ottoman Antiquity Law, German Excavations Campaigns, and the Exodus of Antiquities

15.30–16.00
Coffee break

Section 3: The Legal Pluralism of Objects
Chair: Kaveh Yazdani (Münster)

16.00–16:45
Alice Lopes Fabris (Paris/Brussels) & Caroline Borges (Recife): And What about Internal Restitutions? Legal Aspects of the Artefacts Return to the Local Communities

16.45–17.30
Diogo Machado (Sydney): Colonial Translocations in Legal Discourses Surrounding Indigenous Cultural Objects Recovered in Criminal Proceedings in Brazil

18.00
Dinner

Friday, 9 February 2024

9.30–10.30
Keynote: María Julia Ochoa Jiménez (Sevilla): A Latin American Perspective on Restitution: Legalist and Humanist Views

10.30–11.00
Coffee break

Section 4: Narratives of Belonging
Chair: Larissa Förster (Berlin)

11.00–11.45
Tokie Laotan-Brown (Nova Gorica) & Bekeh Ukelina (Cortland, New York): Returning Emwin Arre to the Benin Kingdom: Using
Traditional Customary Laws as a Path towards Regional Restitution Policies in Nigeria

11.45–12.30
Martin Skrydstrup (Canberra/Copenhagen): Provenience by Proxy: On the Dispute about Spirit Cave Man

12.30–14.00
Lunch break

Section 5: Integrating Pluralism. Thinking Toward Legal Mitigation
Chair: Olaf Zenker (Halle/Saale)

14.00–14.45
Sophie Starrenburg (Leiden): Decentring Cultural Heritage Law? The Emancipatory Potential of Particularistic Legal Universalism

14.45–15.30
Andrzej Jakubowski (Warsaw): Rupture and Continuity: Decolonisation of International Law

15.30–16.00
Coffee break

Section 6: Normative Knowledge and Institutions
Chair: Olaf Zenker (Halle/Saale)

16.00–16.45
Edward Tan Yu Fan (Singapore): An Examination of Liminality at the Raffles Museum of the Straits Settlements, 1884-1939

16.45–17.30
Gracia Lwanzo Kasongo (Louvain) & Placide Mumbembele Sanger (Kinshasa): Restitution and Knowledge Decolonization: Unpacking the Return of the Kakuungu Mask in the DR Congo

18.00
Sebastian M. Spitra & João Figueiredo: Concluding Remarks and Farewell

Kontakt

info.evir@uni-muenster.de

https://www.uni-muenster.de/EViR/veranstaltungen/tagungenundworkshops/forensics.html

CfP: Agriculture and the production of the Global South, 1900s-1960s

2 months 1 week ago

Workshop at the Käte Hamburger Research Centre global dis:connect, LMU Munich

4-5 April 2024

Agriculture and the production of the Global South, 1900s-1960s

The importance of agriculture and extractive industries to the making of the Global South in the 20th century has been obfuscated by the resonance of modernisation theory, dependency theory and development economics since the Second World War. A powerful consensus about the validity of these theories during the Cold War prompted development agencies, international organisations, epistemic communities and national governments, among others, to pursue policies that promoted industrialisation and urbanisation. This consensus forged a powerful, enduring distinction between ‘agricultural’ economies and ‘agrarian’ societies and their ‘industrial’ and ‘modern’ counterparts. The residues of this distinction, which have been reflected in debates over centre and periphery, Global South and Global North, continue to exert a powerful grip on how we think about the possible forms of social, political and economic organisation.

This workshop is motivated by the idea that this distinction is ahistorical and does not capture the prevalence of alternative economic futures envisioned by actors in what is known today as the Global South in the pre- and early post-World War II period. We take such visions as a departure point for this workshop to examine the emergence of agricultural nations and their increased relevance for international economic and political stability amid pervasive concerns about food scarcity and the growth of the global population in the first half of the 20th century. We use the term ‘agricultural nation’ expansively to denote political communities that relied on agriculture, livestock and extractive industries rather than on manufacturing or the services industry as their primary sources of income. The workshop also aims to invite participants covering diverse regions.

Potential topics may include but are not limited to:

- The development of knowledge infrastructures and epistemic communities that helped support or challenge the trajectories of agricultural nations
- The institutional (political, economic, and social) development of agricultural nations at the local or national levels
- The material infrastructure that made the project of agricultural nations possible
- How international monetary regimes and financial infrastructures shaped the pathways to the constitution of agricultural economies
- The role of agriculture and extractive industries in nation-making, state-building and state-formation in the Global South
- The place of agriculture and extractive industries in the anticolonial movement and in processes of decolonization
- The institutionalization of global dis:connections within the Global South and between agricultural and industrial nations
- The place of agriculture and extractive industries at international organizations, in transnational movements, and in emerging regimes of global governance

Proposals should include a provisional title and an abstract of <300 words and a one-page CV. Please send these documents in one PDF file to kinzley@wisc.edu and paula.vedoveli@fgv.br by 22 December 2023.

Accommodation and catering will be provided for the duration of the workshop, and some support for travel may be available. Please let us know in your email whether you require financial support to help defray travel expenses. The workshop is planned as an on-site event, but remote participation may be available for those who cannot attend in person

Contact (announcement)

paula.vedoveli@fgv.br, kinzley@wisc.edu

https://www.globaldisconnect.org

CfP: Moving beyond the center-periphery dynamics: Central and Eastern Europe from the mid-19th century to the present

2 months 1 week ago

The University of Ottawa (Canada) and the University de Lille (France) invite to participate in the conference Moving beyond the center-periphery dynamic: Central and Eastern Europe from the mid-19th century to the present.

Moving beyond the center-periphery dynamics: Central and Eastern Europe from the mid-19th century to the present

April 5-6, 2024 / University of Ottawa, Canada
May 30-31, 2024 / University of Lille, France

The University of Ottawa (Canada) and the University de Lille (France) invite to participate in the conference Moving beyond the center-periphery dynamic: Central and Eastern Europe from the mid-19th century to the present.

This conference will be held on April 5-6, 2024, at the University of Ottawa (Canada), and on May 30-31, 2024, at Université de Lille (France).

All abstracts are due by January 7, 2024.

Since the 18th century, the discourse on modernization—understood as a process aiming to align social organization with the expectations and needs of societies and carrying a promise of emancipation—identifies the Western form of modernity, in its political (democracy) and economic (market capitalism) dimensions, as a model to follow. In the multicultural empires of Central and Eastern Europe, divergences in the paths and rhythms of political, economic, and social modernization engraved in collective imaginaries the idea of a structural delay of these societies compared to the rest of Europe, relegating them to the periphery—or semi-periphery—of the Western world (Ivan T. Berend). Since the works of Larry Wolf and Maria Todorova, this sort of intra-European orientalism has been deconstructed. Nevertheless, the discourse of structural delay in this part of Europe compared to the core of the western world has been influential in the Austrian, Russian, and Ottoman empires and in the countries that succeeded them, from the end of the First World War to today. This discourse justified structural reforms and enabled the rise of social groups interested in and useful for these reforms. It also fueled dissenting discourses and contributed to the production of alternative models, in a relationship of interdependence and exchange with countries situated in the core of the Western world (Claudia Kraft).

This conference aims to examine the experience of Central and Eastern European countries with the modernization process from the late 18th century to the present, beyond the center-periphery dynamics.

The conference will take place in two sessions, one in Ottawa (Canada) and the other in Lille (France). The organizers seek proposals that engage these questions. Proposals may focus on any time period and may draw from any discipline, including but not limited to history, political science, sociology, anthropology, economics, and law. The presentations of 15-20 minutes should fit into at least one of the following themes:

1. Modernization Strategies

It is customary to consider that faced with the challenges of following the Western model of modernization ("double revolution," Eric Hobsbawm) in the same form and at the same pace, countries of Central and Eastern Europe gradually turned towards alternative models, more rooted in the local context. These ranged from the Enlightened absolutism of 18th and 19th century to physiocratic movements, agrarianism, fascism, communism, and illiberal democracies today. Some of these alternative modernization strategies reinforced the power of the State and its authoritarian tendencies at the expense of individual and collective freedoms. Most of them challenge the Western model in terms of its effectiveness, universality, and adaptability to a different context from the one for which it was created.

From this perspective, it would be possible to examine the causes of the emergence of these models, their logics and operational mechanisms, their relationships with the Western model and with other counter-models developed in other spaces located at the periphery of the Western world (Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, etc.), and the factors that facilitated or hindered their adoption.

2. Actors and Spaces of Modernization

The study of the actors involved in the process of modernization, their particular interests, and potential synergies sheds light on their capacity to define the norms of their own existence. It can be approached by examining debates about the advantages and disadvantages of adopting the Western model or even its feasibility, considering the nature of local societies. It can also be explored by studying the ways knowledge and know-how circulated within this region, between this region and the core of the Western world, or other (semi-)peripheral regions—ranging from multicultural empires in the 19th century to global illiberal regimes today, to the Eastern, Western, and Southern blocs during the Cold War era. Another possible way is to examine various arenas where these debates took place: the media, salons, scholarly circles, economic networks, Masonic lodges, corporations, or party universities. From diffusionist models to polycentric phenomena, various interconnected experiences and forms of modernity emerged, constantly influenced by the international context.

Several spaces assume the roles of showcases and laboratories for modernization. In the 19th century, cities like Trieste, Sarajevo, Timisoara, or Lviv played this role for the Habsburg Empire, just as Saint Petersburg or Odessa did for the Romanovs, Thessaloniki for the Ottoman Empire, or Essen for the Hohenzollerns. Between the wars, innovative modernization projects emerged, such as the districts of Red Vienna or the worker city of Baťa in Zlín. Under socialism, these "laboratories of modernity" were embodied by new cities like Stalinvaros, Nowa Huta, Dimitrovgrad, or Stalinstadt. Simultaneously, these spaces of intensive modernization existed alongside areas experiencing chronic developmental delays.

3. The Chronology of Modernization

Another way to study the modernization process is by examining its chronology. It is often claimed that Central and Eastern European countries experienced a delayed modernization, lagging behind the economic and political core of the continent. This modernization accelerated from the 1860s-1870s, prompted by the confrontation with a more developed West, before slowing down between the wars due to unfavorable economic and political factors. It then experienced a new acceleration after 1945, thanks to socialist-style modernization, which itself faced a crisis in the 1970s, before witnessing a new surge since the 1980s, as these countries progressively aligned with capitalism and democracy.

This overall periodization could be subject to debate when considering its rhythms of modernisation of this region, its moments of acceleration and deceleration, discrepancies concerning the adopted models, or the breaks and continuities in the long term, well before the 19th century, and taking into account the political changes, revolutions, and wars that this region has experienced, along with the contexts, scales, and models of modernization deployed.

4. The Impact of Modernization Strategies

What is the impact of the various modernization strategies implemented in Central and Eastern European countries on their social structures and political communities, economies and technological development, and cultural identities? How did these modernization strategies affect social hierarchies and mobility, ethnic and class divisions, relations between urban and rural areas, between the capital and provincial centers, and among regions? Last but not least, what is their legacy today?

Submission Guidelines

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract in French or in English outlining the topic and approach of your work by January 7, 2024, to boris.vinogradov@univ-lille.fr.

The authors of the submissions will be notified of the selections by January 20, 2024, at the latest.

Financial assistance will be available to support panelists’ travel and lodging expenses. Selected papers will be published as a collective volume.

Please reach out to the conference organizers with any questions: Roman Krakovsky (roman.krakovsky@uottawa.ca) and Boris Vinogradov (boris.vinogradov@univ-lille.fr).

This conference is jointly funded by the Chair in Slovak History and Culture of the University of Ottawa, and Chaire d’excellence de l’Université de Lille.

Contact (announcement)

Roman Krakovsky (roman.krakovsky@uottawa.ca) and Boris Vinogradov (boris.vinogradov@univ-lille.fr)

CfP: Militer au sein des réseaux internationalistes - une histoire globale par le bas (French)

2 months 1 week ago

18 June to 19 June, 2024 (Straßbourg)

Le présent colloque souhaite redéfinir l’internationalisme à travers ses réseaux et ses pratiques militantes en travaillant à partir des échelles macro et micro, afin de lui conférer une ouverture extra-européenne. Cette exigence répond au dialogue entre une histoire globale et une approche « par le bas  ». Ces deux approches contribuent au renouveau de la prosopographie et à la redéfinition des enjeux herméneutiques du travail biographique, notamment lorsqu’elles se fondent sur l’expérience et la phénoménologie des pratiques militantes, et leur spatialisation géographique et sociologique. De ce fait, les dynamiques de genre, les Subaltern studies, l’Alltagsgeschichte et les solidarités constitueront le nœud de ce colloque.

Argumentaire scientifique

Paradoxal, le XIXe siècle connut un double processus aussi antagonique que consubstantiel[1]. D’un côté, les Européens dessinaient les contours de leurs nouvelles communautés nationales sous l’égide d’une domination capitaliste abreuvée de mythes nationaux[2] et de la recherche constante d’homogénéité des sociétés[3]. De l’autre, la création de ces nouveaux contours faisait naître, intellectuellement, pratiquement et spatialement, les internationalismes. Souvent écrit au singulier, ce concept servait, avant toute chose, à décrire des objectifs et des dynamiques d’organisation au sein du mouvement ouvrier. Pourtant, « l’internationalisme a pris de nombreuses formes, des mobilisations populaires aux structures institutionnalisées »[4]. Des mouvements féministes aux anticolonialistes, tous connurent leurs internationalismes, qu’ils fussent formels ou informels. Récemment, la focale s’est déplacée vers des courants politiques réputés moins enclins à l’internationalisme, tels que le conservatisme et le nationalisme. A contrario, le libéralisme et le pacifisme, séculaires pensées internationalisées, ont connu un renouvellement historiographique à travers la revue Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence[5] et les travaux de Jean-Michel Guieu et Stanislas Jeannesson[6]

Ces nouvelles approches s’accompagnent d’une redéfinition du concept d’internationalisme et de ses protagonistes, les internationalistes. Ainsi, les historiens Michele di Donato et Mathieu Fulla décrivent les « internationalistes » comme des membres de communautés qui transcendent les frontières nationales, sans se contenter de les franchir[7]. Pour autant, le concept d’internationaliste a ceci de commun avec l’histoire transnationale, c’est qu’il fut souvent galvaudé afin de décrire des courants extra-frontaliers n'ayant pourtant aucune dynamique et pratiques militantes communes.

Ce présent colloque souhaite redéfinir l’internationalisme à travers ses réseaux et ses pratiques militantes en travaillant à partir des échelles macro et micro, afin de lui conférer une ouverture extra-européenne. Ici, nous entendons rompre avec un objet d’étude qui fut trop souvent confiné aux frontières de l’eurocentrisme, et appréhender le polycentrisme des réseaux internationalistes et leur perspective diachronique. Cette exigence répond au dialogue entre une histoire globale et une approche « par le bas ». La première se définit, selon Dominic Sachsenmaier, comme « d’autres conceptions de l’espace [qui vont] au-delà du nationalisme méthodologique et de l’eurocentrisme »[8]. Là où la seconde privilégie « les thèmes du privé, du personnel et du vécu »[9]. Elle crée une « histoire mosaïque » qui se conjugue bien avec l’histoire globale. Ces deux approches contribuent au renouveau de la prosopographie et à la redéfinition des enjeux herméneutiques du travail biographique[10], notamment lorsqu’elles se fondent sur l’expérience et la phénoménologie des pratiques militantes, et leur spatialisation géographique et sociologique. De ce fait, les dynamiques de genre, les Subaltern studies, l’Alltagsgeschichte et les solidarités constitueront le nœud de ce colloque. Elles nous permettront d’aborder les nouvelles recherches sur le mouvement ouvrier, la décolonisation et le féminisme, tout en faisant apparaître des questionnements nouveaux sur les courants conservateurs, nationalistes et libéraux. Ainsi, "Histoire par le bas", Global history et Histoire transnationale joueront de concert dans notre colloque.

Axes possibles
  • Différences entre internationalisme formel et informel
  • Spatialisation des réseaux internationalistes
  • Sociabilités militantes
  • Solidarités militantes
  • Transferts culturels/Transferts matériels
  • Vie quotidienne des militants et militantes sur le modèle de l’Alltagsgeschichte

Les communications ne devront pas dépasser 20 minutes.

Les langues de travail seront le français et l’anglais.

Le colloque se déroulera à l'Université de Strasbourg, les 18-19 juin 2024.

Il fera l’objet d’une publication collective à l’issue de nos riches échanges.

Modalités de soummission

Envoyez vos retours à l’adresse suivante :

colloqueinternationalistes@gmail.com

avant le 31 janvier 2024.

Il vous sera demandé :

  • Un résumé de 500 mots maximum.
  • Une bibliographie indicative de 6 ouvrages.
  • Une courte biographie de 4 à 5 lignes.
Comité scientifique
  • Nicolas Delalande (Sciences Po Paris)
  • Delphine Diaz (Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne)
  • Alexandre Dupont (Université de Strasbourg)
  • Darya Dyakonova (International Institute in Geneva)
  • Stéphanie Prezioso (Université de Lausanne)
  • Clément Thibaud (Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales)
Comité d’organisation
  • Lola Romieux (UR 3400 ARCHE, Université de Strasbourg)
  • Clément Fontannaz (UMR 7069 LinCS, Université de Strasbourg)
  • Andrea Benedetti (UMR 7069 LinCS, Université de Strasbourg)
Bibliographie indicative
  • Anceau Éric, Boudon Jacques-Olivier et Olivier Dard (dir.), Histoire des Internationales : Europe, XIXe-XXe siècles, Paris, Nouveau monde, 2017.
  • Bensimon Fabrice, Deluermoz Quentin et Moisand Jeanne (dir.), “Arise Ye Wretched of the Earth”: The First International in a Global Perspective, Leyde, Brill, 2018.
  • Blain Keisha N. et Gill Tiffany M., To Turn the Whole World Over: Black Women and Internationalism, Urbana, University of Illinois Press, 2019.
  • Delalande Nicolas, La lutte et l'entraide : l'âge des solidarités ouvrières, Paris, Seuil, 2019.
  • Di Donato Michele et Mathieu Fulla (dir.), Leftist Internationalisms, Londres, Bloomsbury, 2023.
  • Ducange Jean-Numa, Keucheyan Razmig et Roza Stéphanie (dir.), Histoire globale des socialismes, XIXe-XXIe siècle, Paris, PUF, 2021.
  • Dupont Alexandre, Une internationale blanche. Histoire d’une mobilisation royaliste entre France et Espagne dans les années 1870, Paris, Éditions de la Sorbonne, 2020.
  • Johannes Großmann, Die Internationale der Konservativen: Transnationale Elitenzirkel und private Außenpolitik in Westeuropa seit 1945, Berlin, De Gruyter, 2014.
  • Guieu Jean-Michel et Jeannesson Stanislas (dir.), « La Société des Nations, une expérience de l’internationalisme », Monde(s). Histoire, espaces, relations, n° 19, 2021.
  • Isabella Maurizio, Risorgimento in Exile: Italian Emigrés and the Liberal International in the post-napoleonic Era, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2009.
  • Manjapras Kris, M.N. Roy: Marxism and Colonial Cosmopolitanism, Londres, Routledge, 2010.
  • Mokhtefi Elaine, Alger, capitale de la révolution : de Fanon aux Black Panthers, Paris, La Fabrique, 2019.
  • Palheta Ugo, La nouvelle internationale fasciste, Paris, Textuel, 2022.
  • Papini Roberto, L’Internationale démocrate-chrétienne. La coopération internationale entre les démocrates-chrétiens de 1925 à 1986, Paris, Cerf, 1988.
  • Rupp Leila J., « Constructing Internationalism: The Case of Transnational Women’s Organizations, 1888-1945 », The American Historical Review, vol. 99, n° 5, 1994, pp. 1571-1600.
  • Studer Brigitte, Travellers of the World Revolution: A Global History of the Communist International, Londre/New-York, Verso, 2023 [2020].
  • Studer Brigitte, The transnational world of the Cominternians, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015.
  • Tzu-Chun Judy, Radicals on the Road: Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era, Ithaca, Cornell University Press, 2013.
  • Van Der Linden Marcel, Transnational Labour History: Explorations, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2003.
  • Von Holthoon Frits et Van Der Linden Marcel (dir.), Internationalism and the Labour Movement, 1830 –1940, Leyde, Brill, 1988.
Notes

[1] Rupp Leila J., « Constructing Internationalism: The Case of Transnational Women’s Organizations, 1888-1945 », The American Historical Review, vol. 99, n° 5, 1994, p. 1571.

URL : https://www.jstor.org/stable/2168389

[2] Citron Suzanne, Le mythe national, Ivry-sur-Seine, Les éditions de l’Atelier, 2008.

[3] Slezkine Yuri, Le siècle des juifs, Paris, La Découverte et Seuil, 2008 [2004], p. 109.

[4] Di Donato Michele et Mathieu Fulla (dir.), Leftist Internationalisms, Londres, Bloomsbury, 2023, intro., para. 2.

URL: https://www.perlego.com/book/3790687/leftist-internationalisms-a-transnational-political-history-pdf  

[5] Sous la direction d’Alexandre Christoyannopoulos, University of Loughborough.

[6] Guieu Jean-Michel et Jeannesson Stanislas (dir.), « La Société des Nations, une expérience de l’internationalisme », Monde(s). Histoire, espaces, relations, n° 19, 2021.

[7] Tzu-Chun Judy, Radicals on the Road, Ithaca, Cornell University Press, 2013, intro., para.5.

URL:https://www.perlego.com/book/1039065/radicals-on-the-road-internationalism-orientalism-and-feminism-during-the-vietnam-era-pdf

[8] « Alternative conceptions of space beyond methodological nationalism and Eurocentrism. »; Sachsenmaier Dominic, « Global History », Version: 1.0, in: Docupedia-Zeitgeschichte, 11.02.2010

http://docupedia.de/zg/sachsenmaier_global_history_v1_en_2010

[9] Ginzburg Carlo et Poni Carlo, « La micro-histoire », Le Débat, vol. 10, n° 17, 1981, p.133.

[10] Manjapra Kris, M.N. Roy: Marxism and Colonial Cosmopolitanism, Londres, Routledge, 2010.

CfP: L’africanité en mouvement (French)

2 months 1 week ago

Ce colloque tente de mettre en lumière de nouvelles lectures relatives au phénomène migratoire en Afrique, ses enjeux économique, socioculturel et politique en s’appuyant sur l'analyse des médias, la littérature, les documents historiques, le cinéma…. L’objectif est d’interroger la question migratoire dans toute sa complexité, ainsi que la vulnérabilité de la personne migrante, eu égard à sa stigmatisation et aux différentes visions dévalorisantes et/ou valorisantes à son sujet, des discours et des images qui demeurent polémiques et pourraient engendrer des dérapages et des glissements sémantiques, constituant ainsi l’objet d’étude de chercheurs appartenant à différents champs disciplinaires.

06-07 mai 2024 Université Mohamed Ben Ahmed, Oran 2

Argumentaire

L’histoire de l’humanité s’est construite au fil du temps et des circonstances. L’Homme  de par sa  nature nomade a parcouru la terre pour diverses raisons et attentes,  de l’Afrique à l’Europe, en passant par l’Asie, et bien plus tard les Amériques.

La migration est devenue  un véritable enjeu de politique publique internationale eu égard aux nombreuses pertes humaines enregistrées ces dernières années dans le monde et plus particulièrement en mer méditerranée.

Ce phénomène a pris ces dernières années une ampleur considérable, et ce pour de nombreuses raisons. Tout d'abord, la migration Sud-Nord, qui constitue 30 % des flux migratoires mondiaux, et la migration Sud-Sud suite à certaines  lois d'accès restrictives, adoptées par les pays du Nord.

Notre colloque porte sur la mobilité humaine en Afrique et ses différents genres,  aspects, formes  et conditions. Ce sera également l'occasion d'aborder la question de la migration de l'Afrique vers d'autres continents et au sein même de l’Afrique.

Ce colloque tente de mettre en lumière de nouvelles lectures relatives au phénomène migratoire en Afrique, ses enjeux économique, socioculturel et politique en s’appuyant sur des supports tels que : médias, Littérature, documents historiques, Cinéma…. L’objectif est d’interroger la question migratoire dans toute sa complexité, ainsi que la vulnérabilité de la personne migrante, eu égard à sa stigmatisation (Clichés et stéréotypes) et aux différentes visions dévalorisantes et/ou valorisantes à son sujet, des discours et des images qui demeurent polémiques et pourraient  engendrer des dérapages et des glissements sémantiques, constituant ainsi l’objet d’étude de chercheurs appartenant à différents champs disciplinaires.

Longtemps passée sous silence, oubliée des questions mondiales, la migration constitue un thème d’actualité, elle  est devenue un réel enjeu planétaire (Catherine Wihtol de Wenden, 2017),  ce qui nous amène à nous interroger sur la manière dont la question migratoire est traitée : Quelles sont les  représentations des migrants et quels en sont les différents écarts de réception au sein du bassin méditerranéen ? (Pascal Laborderie, Hanane El Bachir(2020),  Quel est l’impact des discours autour de la migration sur l’inconscient collectif ? Comment les textes et les images médiatiques (Bonvoisin Daniel,2018) font parler la figure de l’exilé et les conditions migratoires contemporaines ? (Nouss Alexis, 2015). En matière de création artistique, dans quelle mesure certains supports  participent à fabriquer  de multiples imaginaires autour du phénomène migratoire ?

Le colloque s’articulera autour des axes suivants :

  • Migration : Histoire et état des lieux
  • Migration, émigration, immigration : évolution des concepts
  • Migration entre identité, altérité et interculturalité
  • Migration et genre
  • Migration et espace médiatique : entre représentation et écarts de réception
  • Migration et ses représentations dans la littérature, le cinéma, le théâtre, la bande dessinée

Sur le plan méthodologique, seront privilégiées les approches suivantes : analyse textuelle, esthétique de la réception, sémiologie du texte et de l’image, analyse du discours, etc

Modalités de participation

Les communications peuvent être rédigées en français, anglais, arabe, espagnol, allemand et russe. Les auteurs sont priés d'envoyer initialement le résumé de leur communication, comprenant :

Nom :

  • Prénom :
  • Affiliation : e.mail :
  • Brève biobibliographie : 
  • Titre de la communication :
  • Résumé (500mots maximum) :
  • Mots clés :

L’e-mail de contact est : africanite.mouvement@gmail.com. 

Calendrier :

  • 30 janvier 2024 : Réception des résumés
  • 15 février 2024 : Notification d'acceptation
  • 01 mai 2024 : Réception des textes intégraux
  • 06-07 mai 2024 : Tenue du colloque

L'organisation vous remercie par avance de votre intérêt et de votre participation au premier congrès international "L’Africanité en Mouvement", et se réjouit de vous accueillir en mai 2024 à l'Université d’Oran 2

Comité scientifique

 

COMITE SCIENTIFIQUEOMITE

 العلمية اللجنةCIENTIFICO/

  • TOUIL Khalida Univ. Oran2
  • EL BACHIR HANANE Univ. Oran2
  • MOUSSAOUI Nabila Univ. Oran 2
  • LABORDERIE Pascal Univ. Reims Champagne-Ardenne
  • CARMEN Márquez Montes University of Las palmas de gran Canaria, Espagne
  • BEHILIL Abdelkader Univ. Oran2
  • AISSAOUI Souad Univ. Oran2
  • BELMEKKI BELkacem Univ. Oran 2
  • SANCHEZ NORIEGA José Luis Univ. Complutense, Espagne
  • CHOUCHA Zouaoui Univ. Oran2
  • CHAMI Nidhal Univ. Oran2
  • LAKHDARI Sadi Univ. Paris 4
  • SAYAD Abdelkader Univ. Mostaganem
  • MALKI Sofiane Univ. Mostaganem
  • BEGHADID Halima Univ. Oran2
  • MAHREZ Nagwa Univ.Caire (Egypte)
  • MAHDI Fatima Zohra Univ. Oran2
  • DALA Samia Univ. Oran2
  • BALLESTER PARDO Ignacio  Univ.de Alicante, Espagne
  • EL BACHIR Amel Univ. Oran 2
  • MIMOUNI Dounia Univ. Oran 2
  • BELBACHIR Fatima Zohra Univ. Oran2
  • BEDEB Kheira Univ. Oran2
  • BENNOUR Hadjéra Univ. Oran2
  • FERRIN Emilio González  Univ. Seville ( Espagne)
  • FEKIH Saléha Univ. Oran Mostaganem
  • SAIM Houari Univ. Ain Témouchent
  • SALAH Mohammed Mounir Univ. Alger 2
  • KHELIFA Mohamed Amine  Univ. Oran 2
  • MAMI Ridha Univ.Manouba (Tunisie)
  • ZERMANI Malika  Univ. Alger 2
  • SCHNEIDER Anne Univ. Caen
  • BRINKER Virginie Univ. Bourgogne
  • HASSAINE Sihem  Univ. Oran 2
  • DERMI Amel Univ. Tlemcen
  • SOUALI Widad Univ. Oran 2
  • BOUDEHIR Tahar Univ. Oran 2
  • AMROUCHE Feirouz Univ. Oran 2
  • DJEBBOUR Oum El Univ. Oran 2
  • Khir SARI Latifa Univ. Tlemcen
  • BENCHERIF Mohamed   Univ. Tlemcen
  • Zakaria Ali
  • NAUMANN Michel  Univ. Cergy Pontoise
  • MAHIEDDINE Azzeddine Univ. Tlemcen
Comité d'organisation
  • BENNOUR Hadjira
  • BENALI AMAR Nouara
  • DAD Djohra
  • CHAHROUR Nabila 
  • KHELIFA Mohamed Amine 
  • REZIGA Fatima
  • BENTATA Soumeya
  • RAFAI Naimi
  • KOUKEB Nardjes EL BACHIR Amel
  • HARRAT Férie
  • HENNOUS Samira
  • BENMAHIEDDIE Sarah 
  • BEDEB Kheira 
  • DAHIAS Fatma 
  • BOUNIF Thanina 
  • SEHARI Aicha  
  • ZATOUT Hanane 
  • BENAMEUR Yahia 
  • NAAB Lahouaria  
  • MALEM Hadjer  Histoire en Afrique (Labo W11921) Université d’Oran 2 Mohamed Ben Ahmed, Faculté des Langues Etrangères 
  • BELLAHOUALE Narimane 
  • YOUNES Saidi 
  • TOUIL Rachid Sofiane 
  • AMROUCHE Feirouz 
  • REZINI Zahra
Bibliographie

ALI BENHERIF  Mohammed Zakaria, La mobilité régulière des migrants vers les pays d’origine : Une stratégie familiale pour  la mise en contact des enfants avec la (les) langues et la culture(2017) : Insaniyat

ALI-OUALLA Myriame et RIGONI Isabelle (dir.) (2020), Migrations en images, Revue française des méthodes visuelles : n° 4, Bordeaux.

 BONVOISIN Daniel, (2018) « L’image des migrants véhiculée par les médias », Rapport sur « Les échanges de midi autour de l’interculturel ». Accès : http://cainamur.be/images/pdf/publications/2018_juin_portefeuille_image… %C3%A9es_par_les_m%C3%A9dias.pdf.

BRINKER Virginie et MESLET Sandrine (2017), « Figures littéraires d’exilés, réfugiés, migrants en classe de quatrième », Le français aujourd’hui, 197, « Littérature et valeurs » (sous la dir. de Lydie Laroque et Caroline Raulet-Marcel)

Camille Schmoll (2015), Migration en méditerranée. Permanences et mutations à l’heure des révolutions et des crises : Hélène THIOLLE, Catherine WIHTOL DE WENDEN (dir), Paris : CNRS éditions. Camille Schmoll (2020), « Les damnées de la mer : Femmes et frontières en Méditerranée », Paris : La découverte

Catherine Wihtol de Wenden(2017), La question migratoire au XXI Siècle Migrants, réfugiés et relations internationales «3e édition entièrement actualisée, Paris : Siences Po Les presses.

DJAÏDANI,  Rachid (2007), Viscéral, Paris :   Seuil.

ECO Umberto, (1985), Lector in Fabula, Paris : Grasset.

EL BACHIR Hanane et LABORDERIE Pascal (dir.), Images, coopération et échanges interculturels en Méditerranée, Communication, technologies et développement, n° 7, 2019.

EL KEBIR, Akram (2019), Les Fleuves impassibles, Alger :APIC

Guglielmo SCAFIRIMUTO (2021), Français.e d’origine étrangère ? Les documentaire autobiographiques diasporiques en France, PARIS : L’Harmattan, Coll « Champs visuels)

HARGREAVES, Alec G, (1995), La littérature issue de l’immigration maghrébine en France : une littérature ‘mineure’ ? Université de Loughborough, Angleterre.

JAUSS HANS Robert, (1990) : Pour une esthétique de la réception, Paris : Gallimard.

KERBRAT-ORECCHIONI Catherine, (1986). L'implicite, Paris : Armand Colin.

KERBRAT-ORECCHIONI C., (1984), La Connotation, Lyon, PUL.

LACHKAR. A., dir., (2014), Langues, cultures et médias en Méditerranée, Paris : L’Harmattan.

MAHIEDDINE Azzeddine,  Mohammed Zakaria Ali BENCHERIF,(2017) Dynamique des répertoires verbaux chez les étudiants algériens en mobilité Universitaire en France : Insaniyet

MAZAURIC Catherine, Mobilités d'Afrique en Europe, Récits et figures de l'aventure, Paris, Karthala, 2012.

MILIANI Hadj, « Diasporas musiciennes et migrations maghrébines en situation coloniale », Volume, 2015/2 (12:1), p. 155-169.

MOHAMMEDI Sidi Mohammed  (2021), Expériences migratoires. Recherche selon la perspective d’Abdelmalek SAYAD, CRASC

NOUSS Alexis, La Condition de l’exilé, Penser les migrations contemporaines, Paris, Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l’homme, 2015.

SARI M. Latifa, « Manuel scolaire algérien entre dépréciation et valorisation du migrant », Ouvrage collectif sous la direction de Bruno Maurer, « Migrants et migration dans les manuels scolaires en méditeranée, Paris, L’Harmattan.

SAYAD Abdelmalek. (1991), L’Immigration ou les paradoxes de l’altérité, De Boeck

Communist Women Activists around the World

2 months 1 week ago

09 JANUARY 2024 - 16:00 — 09 JANUARY 2024 - 17:00

Lecture by Francisca de Haan about her recently published Palgrave Handbook of Communist Women Activists around the World.

In twenty-five chapters, based on new and primary research, this book discusses the lives of self-identified communist women from all continents and across the twentieth century. The chapters show that these women were leaders in anti-colonial struggles and in advancing women’s rights on the global level. The chapters capture the broader picture of their lives, the formal networks and politics in which they were involved, the ways in which anti-communist violence affected them and their struggles, as well as the informal connections and friendships that supported their activism at the national and international level.

In her talk de Haan will first sketch the main points in which this book challenges the existing historiography on both the history of communism and the history of the global women’s movement. She will then briefly present three of the case studies included, and will end with a short discussion of why this topic matters for our contemporary world.

Practicalities
Date:
 9 January 2024
Time: 16:00 – 17:00 (with drinks afterwards)
Place: Cruquiusweg 31,  Amsterdam
Entrance: Free of charge, but please register via secretar@iisg.nl

For more information: https://iisg.amsterdam/en/events/communist-women-activists

Labour migration past and present, seminar 12 April 2024, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2 months 1 week ago

The Center for the History of Migrants (CGM) organizes its annual study day in cooperation with the Center for Migration Law in Nijmegen and is looking for call for presentations.

The theme is 'Labour migration past and present'. Among other things, we reflect on the recruitment agreements that Belgium and the Netherlands concluded with Turkey and Morocco 60 years ago.

We are looking for presentations on various topics related to labor migration. In doing so, the CGM also provides space for people from the heritage sector and beginning researchers. In addition, we are organizing a poster session where master's students can present their master's thesis.

Are you or do you know someone who would like to present? Then surf to our website for details and don't hesitate to contact us.

We would love to hear from you!

For more information: https://iisg.amsterdam/en/events/labour-migration-past-and-present

YMHC #13 : Things that Grow in the Earth: Recovering Resources in the Early Modern World - by Sebastian Felten (University of Vienna)

2 months 1 week ago

The Young Mining Historians Corner is a blog post series edited by the Labour In Mining WG dedicated
to early career researchers in mining history broadly constructed.

The Issue 13 has been just published:  

Things that Grow in the Earth: Recovering Resources in the Early Modern World - by Sebastian Felten (University of Vienna)

 https://lim.hypotheses.org/2899

Sebastain Felten’s fascinating contribution brings us to the early modern period, when theories and practices of mining regarded metals as living entities growing underground. How did humanists, practitioners, and early modern people in general integrate this view with the broader economic, bureaucratic, and political use of resources? Read the blog to find out more!

 Find all the previous issues here: https://lim.hypotheses.org/category/ymhc
Contact LiM WG for more information at labourinmining@gmail.com

YMHC editors: Francesca Sanna, Gabriele Marcon, Nikolaos Olma
 

CfP Special issues of journal Workers of the World

2 months 1 week ago

Workers of the World: International Journal on Strikes and Social Conflict aims to stimulate global studies on labor and social conflicts in an interdisciplinary, global, long term historical and non-Eurocentric perspective. It intends to move away from traditional forms of methodological nationalism and conjectural studies, adopting an explicitly critical and interdisciplinary perspective. Therefore, it will publish empirical research and theoretical discussions that address strikes and social conflicts in an innovative and rigorous manner. It will also promote dialogue between scholars from different fields and different countries and disseminate analyzes on different sociocultural realities, to give visibility and centrality to this theme.

Two calls for contributions for future special issues

Strikes, Social Conflicts, and Class Struggle in Wartime

The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 symbolizes the end of a period of armed equilibrium between the two powers that led much of the world and that at the Yalta Conference, in 1945, agreed to delineate the respective spaces of influence. Even if this balance was hidden in several real conflicts that hellishly heated up the temperature of a so-called “cold” war, especially in the colonial spaces of Africa and South-East Asia, the armed conflicts that persisted left out, at least directly, the main powers and their arsenals. With the destruction of the wall, the previous balance in the apparent supremacy of the victorious power and the rise of others on significant regional scales, the danger of uncontrolled military escalations and the absence of international institutions capable of settling disagreements seems to be the new and threatening reality. International law is a dead letter and force remains the rule of armed imposition of all conflicts.

Conflicts between states and nations, of nationalities within the same national spaces, bloody civil wars from which drug traffickers and the burgeoning war industry take advantage. The "infinite war" that ushered in the 21st century, through the farce of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, was after all a neocolonial project for the control of strategic resources and corporate profits in the reconstruction of everything that the weapons had destroyed. The Middle East and the curse of its fossil wealth have made its populations victims of colonialism and exploitation by national elites, invariably educated and trained in the West, but it also provides us with the most blatant example of the hypocrisy of a discourse on human rights that has never served to ensure Palestinian self-determination, let alone the most basic rights of a besieged and occupied population.

In the face of all the conflicts and wars that follow one another within the framework of imperialist disputes, or in the strengthening of the control of the means of production in regions deprived of all the most basic rights, there have always been reactions and enormous mobilizations that have countered them and ensured internationalist solidarity between peoples. Although the position of the German revolutionaries, contrary to the approval of the credits of the Great War by the Reichstag, was the class expression of those who did not accept the imperialist war or the arguments of nationalist fervor for the enormous destruction and example of barbarism that this war meant in Europe.

The Barcelona dockers, by refusing to load military equipment to Israel, are a current example of the effective solidarity that can counter the illegitimate occupation of Palestine and today's colonial projects. The movement of deserters from the colonial countries in the wars of liberation, in Africa or Vietnam, as in Israel today, more than examples of courage, are signs of an internationalism with a class signal.

The concrete organization of workers against imperialist wars and neo-colonialism, through strikes or the participation in anti-war movements, had and still has a profound significance for the possibilities of self-determination of peoples, for decent living, and for decent living and working conditions in the fair distribution of wealth, the only ways to equate a world at peace.

In this sense, we invite contributions to the Workers of the World journal that explore the nature and processes of all those moments, in the past and in the present, in which the workers' movement influenced the course of the war and was decisive for its end.

The papers must be presented before the 28th of February 2024 and sent to the Executive Board at workersoftheworld1848@gmail.com

Strike Activity in the 21st Century: Implications of the Recent Global Upsurge

Selected papers will be considered for publishing

While global capitalism has remained in the grip of a series of multi-dimensional and intertwined crises (including ongoing economic malaise, legacy of Covid, escalating impact of climate change, intensification of wars in different parts of the world such as Ukraine, Palestine and Africa and geopolitical crisis between Russia, China and the West, and the mounting debt crisis in the Global South), the past 18 months or so has also seen a welcome resurgence of strike action and social conflicts in many different countries around the world, representing a new, different and exciting period.

With the onset of the global financial crisis at the beginning of the 21st century there had already been a comeback of strikes and labour struggles in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, as well as a series of strikes against austerity in Western Europe. While the level of workers’ resistance was generally not sustained for long, there were elements of the global crisis that continued to create widespread anger and radicalisation, with an increasing political generalisation about the system of capitalism and the problems it creates, particularly among young people shaped by social movements such as Black Lives Matter, #MeToo and climate protests.

And more recently there has been a new upsurge of angry and defiant strike movements at varying levels of intensity and momentum in numerous countries, including France, Britain, Greece, Portugal, Belgium, United States, Canada, Sri Lanka, South Africa, and China, with workers rediscovering their power when they take collective action.

The revival of such strike activity has contributed to an undermining of the long predominant view that such action was no longer feasible due to widespread structural changes in the composition of the working class towards ‘precarious’, insecure and fragmented work contexts that make trade unionism and collective action near impossible.

In the light of such developments, we invite contributions to the Workers of the World journal that explore the nature, dynamics, trajectory, limits and potential, and implications of such strikes. As well as both empirical studies and/or analytical interpretations, we would also invite papers not merely on contemporary developments, but also comparative and historical studies that reflect on recent developments in the light of different struggles in the same or other countries and/or time periods.

Potential (but not exclusive) related topics are:

  • The different sectors and varied occupational composition of strikers, involving traditional industrial workers and public services, as well as new areas of employment such as platform work, retail, logistics (including Amazon)
  • Participation and prominence of women strikers, and of migrant and ethnic minority workers
  • Strike tactics, organisation and conduct (such as intermittent days of action versus indefinite strikes, mass picketing, strike committees, rank-and-file networks)
  • Role of national trade unions in initiating and constraining action
  • The role of the labour, socialist and social-democratic parties (often at best irrelevant to the strikes and sometimes openly antagonistic)
  • Extent of development of grassroots independent forms of workers’ organisation inside existing unions
  • Involvement of newer independent radical union-led strikes
  • Links between trade unions and broader social movements
  • Nature of counter-mobilisation by employers, government and local and state authorities, and degree of authoritarian repression of working-class protests

The papers must be presented before the 15th of April 2024 and send to the Executive Board at workersoftheworld1848@gmail.com

CfP: Conference - "Pathways to Empire? Belgian Global Expansion, 1830-1930"

2 months 2 weeks ago

On September 11-13, 2024, KU Leuven will host an international conference on the interrelated themes of imperialism and Belgian expansionism. We welcome paper proposals that explore the theoretical and methodological challenges involved in writing new global histories of imperialism between 1830, when Belgium was founded, and the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Conference - Pathways to Empire? Belgian Global Expansion, 1830-1930"

On September 11-13, 2024, KU Leuven will host an international conference on the interrelated themes of imperialism and Belgian expansionism. We welcome paper proposals that explore the theoretical and methodological challenges involved in writing new global histories of imperialism between 1830, when Belgium was founded, and the Great Depression of the 1930s. Focusing on different actors, institutions, organizations, learned societies, and transnational associations involved in Belgian overseas expansion is an invitation to reflect on definitions of imperialism, colonization and empire, to apply this to the case of Belgian global expansion, and to transcend the conventional focus on the ‘Great Powers'.

Aims

In 1905 the ‘Congrès International d’Expansion Écono-ique Mondiale’ took place in the Belgian city of Mons. It was part of a series of celebrations for a triple jubilee: the 75th anniversary of Belgian independence, King Leopold II’s 70th birthday, and the 20th anniversary of the Congo Free State. The congress marked the conflation of territorial colonization in Congo, economic expansion in the world and complacent projections of power on a global scale. Although Belgian expansion had
kickstarted well before the brutal subjugation of Congo and its peoples, the latter gradually warmed various Belgian elites to expansionist ideas. The aim of this conference is to explore the kind of entanglements that crystalized at the congress in Mons between globalization, capitalism, modern state-building, and imperialism.

The historiography of imperialism tends to focus on the Great Powers, illustrated by the abundant literature on Britain’s ‘gentlemanly imperialism’ or ‘informal empire’. These notions, however, cannot simply be transferred to other European expansion(ist) histories. A burgeoning scholarship on comparative, entangled, and small-state perspectives has demonstrated the importance of examining alternative cases and vantagepoints. In line with exciting new research into ‘colonial Switzerland’ (i.e. colonialism without colonies) and small powers’ involvement in formal
colonization, we propose to focus on Belgian expansionism to rethink common notions of modern imperialism.

Nineteenth-century Belgium is an ideal case to start such an inquiry: Belgian actors, organizations, and infrastructures were vital for the development of the new imperial wave in which several European powers participated. And even earlier, Brussels and Antwerp had been prime
international hubs for the circulation of goods, capital, people, and ideas. Wallonia was one of the world’s most advanced industrial centers and exported weapons, steel, and chemical compounds world-wide. Contrary to some of its neighboring countries, Belgium had limited military power, but could instrumentalize its favorable location and (nominal) neutrality to craft loopholes to advance its
foreign policy agendas. The Leopoldian construction of a so-called double crown – one Belgian, one Congolese – separated the Belgian state from the Congo Free State in theory. In practice, however, the division between the Palace and the country’s institutions was porous at best and often complicated the relation between expansion, imperial discourse, and political power.

These peculiar features of ‘Belgian imperialism’ complicate conventional understandings of Western imperialism. How, for instance, can we connect global (imperialist) processes to Belgian involvement in the construction of railways in Argentine, the migration of Asian indentured laborers to Congo, scientific expeditions to the Pole regions, the composition of the Egyptian Mixed Courts, the
exploitation of mines in Tsarist Russia, or the involvement in the Amazonian rubber trade? And how did diplomats, military men, engineers, missionaries, translators, educators, shippers, or dock workers negotiate, shape, or contest imperial projects and ideologies? To answer these questions, we follow how people, commodities, knowledge, and technologies embedded Belgium in the world and vice versa.

We are especially interested in paper proposals that depart from local, non-Western, or comparative perspectives to investigate aspects of Belgian globalization between 1830 and 1930. Critical and conceptual reflection on the meanings of imperialism, globalization, Belgian-specificity, or expansionism is encouraged. Themes to explore include:

• State-private relations;
• Science, techniques, and infrastructures of empire;
• Labor and empire;
• Sensory histories of empire;
• Environmental history and empire;
• Violence in imperial processes;
• Commodity frontiers;
• Transimperial mobility;
• Anti-imperial resistance;
• New (digital) methods for studying imperialism;
• Imagining of Empire;
• Cultural and business diplomacy in imperial processes;
• Migration, ethnicity, nationalism, and diasporic communities;
• Press, propaganda, and collective memory;
• Use of terminology – imperial, colonial, expansion – by historical actors;
• Role of (local) intermediaries and (in)formal actors

Keynote Speakers
• Manu Karuka (Barnard College, New York)
• Daniel Laqua (Northumbria University, Newcastle)

Practicalities
• Submissions should include name, main affiliation, paper title, abstract, and a short bio (max. 100
words).
• Applicants are invited to submit a 350-word abstract in which their research questions,
objectives, relevant historiographies, and primary sources are clearly outlined.
• Final papers should be submitted in English and will be pre-circulated.
• We intend to publish selected papers.
• You can send your papers to: globalbelgiumconference@gmail.com.
• Travel and accommodation expenses of those who do not dispose of institutional funding will
(partially) be refunded.

Deadline & Dates
Deadline submission abstracts: December 30 • 2023
Notifications of acceptance: January 30 • 2024
Deadline submission papers: July 15 • 2024
Conference: September 11 >13 • 2024

Organizing Committee
• Dr. Houssine Alloul (University of Amsterdam)
• Dr. Michael Auwers (State Archives of Belgium)
• Eline Ceulemans (University of Antwerp)
• Prof. Idesbald Goddeeris (KU Leuven)
• Dr. Gert Huskens (Ghent University)
• Janne Schreurs (KU Leuven)

Contact (announcement)

globalbelgiumconference@gmail.com.

CfP: Participation and Representation – A Democratic Lovestory? Conference of Archiv fuer Sozialgeschichte in preparation of vol. 65 (2025)

2 months 2 weeks ago

Conference in Bonn, 13-14 June 2024

Participation and Representation – A Democratic Lovestory?

Modern democracies are characterised by a fundamental tension: on the one hand, they promise to realise the rule of »the people«, that is the exercise of power by the many, through the widest possible political and social participation, and base their legitimacy on this. On the other hand, even if they are committed to a participatory understanding of democracy, they cannot avoid delegating the rule of the many to representatives who stand for a group or a party: the many then only have the power to vote for their representatives in elections or on specific political issues in referendums. The representative system has therefore been repeatedly criticised, if not condemned, for its lack of participation. The experimentation with (consultative) citizens’ councils currently underway in several countries, including at subnational and supranational levels, is a response to the current demand for additional forms of participation in representative democracy. In addition, extra-parliamentary actors have for some time been asking who is actually represented, what the »representation« of certain groups looks like. This is not a new question in the history of democracy, but it has been discussed with increasing intensity over the last 20 years – including, for example, in relation to the prospect of a loss of trust.

Against the backdrop of the 75th anniversary of the Basic Law and the Federal Republic of Germany, we would like to take this stocktaking as an opportunity to take a systematic look at the (tense) relationship between and complementarity of representation and participation. What role have social or political protests, that is non-representative practices of participation, played in the emergence of modern democratic forms of representation? How specific are the problems of legitimation of political representation for democratic systems and their promise of participation compared to dictatorships that developed authoritarian, plebiscitary forms of political participation of the many? How can the quality of representational relations in democratically organised republics be described in concrete terms and distinguished from those in (constitutional) monarchies, for example? How did democratic relations of representation differ according to time, region, ideological orientation and institutional framework, and what specific or universal understandings and problems of participation were associated with them? Which social classes participated to what extent, who was excluded, and what role did gender roles and ethnicity play in the development of democratic forms of participation? How exactly did participation (symbolic, consultative, decisive) work and how was it represented? How was and is participation specifically limited and restricted by representation; what processes of change can be identified in this respect? And finally: which notions – in the cultural-sociological sense – of participation and political representation, of »people« or party base, of representatives and political leaders characterise the history of modernity? These questions aim not least to shed light on the historicity of terms, concepts and practices in modern democratic societies.

For the 65th volume of the Archiv für Sozialgeschichte, we are looking for contributions that address these questions, focusing on the relationship between participation and representation in modernity and discussing them comparatively or on the basis of a specific case. Of interest is the period from the late eighteenth century to the present, with European and global historical as well as interdisciplinary perspectives explicitly encouraged.

The Friedrich Ebert Foundation will host a conference in Bonn on 13 and 14 June 2024 to develop ideas, topics and questions for contributions on the subject of Archiv für Sozialgeschichte 65 (2025) as outlined above. We invite all those interested to submit proposals to afs@fes.de by 10 February 2024. The proposals should not exceed 3,000 characters and, like the papers and subsequent texts, may be submitted in German or English. The articles subsequently selected by the editors for inclusion in the volume should be approximately 60,000 characters (including footnotes) and should be completed by 31 December 2024.

Kontakt

Philipp Kufferath
afs@fes.de

https://www.fes.de/afs/cfp

CfP: Rendez-vous d’histoire coloniale, 2nd edition: "(Anti)colonialism and (inter)nationalism"

2 months 2 weeks ago

20-22 of June 2024 - Diplomatic Archives - Nantes.

Theme 1 – Rethinking the Empire of Knowledge through the prism of internationalism(s)

Theme 2 – Anti-imperialism et internationalism

Theme 3 – War and peace: international institutions and colonialism

Theme 4 – Nationalisation of societies and the colonial situation

Scientific and organising committee:

Élise Abassade ; Étienne Arnould ; Nadia Biskri ; Vincent Bollenot ; Marie Challet ; Fabienne Chamelot ; Nora Eguienta ; Edith Ekodo ; Luca Nelson-Gabin ; Margot Garcin ; Quentin Gasteuil ; Thaïs Gendry ; Thierry Guillopé ; Mickael Langlois ; Éric Lechevallier ; Hugo Mulonnière ; Anna Nasser ; Adrien Nery ; Martino Oppizzi ; Maëlle Pennéguès ; Antonin Plarier ; Christelle Rabier ; Chloé Rosner ; Margo Stemmelin.

Please find attached the detailed Call for Papers with all further information.

CfP: Exposing and punishing "forgery". The policing of professions in the early modern era (15th-18th centuries)

2 months 2 weeks ago

Paris, September 12-13, 2024

The aim of this conference is to examine the uses of the notion of ‘forgery’ in policing any given trade or economic activity in the early modern town and/or its peripheries. In other words, to question whether there existed one or more models of such suitable policing through the qualification of what was ‘fraud’. To state the ‘fraudulent’ character of a thing implied mobilizing an expertise, but also to recall and endorse an authority, including and perhaps especially in a context of existing competing jurisdictions, or standards. Is this accusation based primarily on legal, economic, social or religious dimensions? Is pointing at ’fraud’ a manner of making room for obedience or prohibitions, in search of the integrity of goods, prices and services to the public, or on the contrary a manner of circumscribing a status to the happy few? Does this accusation draw lines to exclude, serve to include by means of a constrained procedure, or merely reaffirm an existing rule?

The conference will take place at Paris, Ehess-Université Paris-Ouest on September 12-13, 2024.

Argument

The aim of this conference is to examine the uses of the notion of ‘forgery’ in policing any given trade or economic activity in the early modern town and/or its peripheries. In other words, to question whether there existed one or more models of such suitable policing through the qualification of what was ‘fraud’.

Our approach inscribes itself in the scholarship that, over the last fifteen years, has revisited the economic practices of Ancien Régime men and women in terms of their inclusion in regimes of power or belonging, also by taking into account the actors themselves challenging these regimes. The focus placed on the possibilities of interpersonal negotiation surrounding the exercise of a given economic activity (manufacturing, retailing, services, access to credit) has shed light on the agents’ practical knowledge or expertise. The fact remains, however, that their skills, whether individual or collective, insofar as they inscribed themselves in social and political contexts, were not without limits.

Qualifying, judging and punishing ’fraud’, whether rightly or wrongly singled out in a product, a service or a person's legal status, is one of the recurring expressions of such limits. Whether expressed individually or collectively, based on custom or positive law, such an accusation referred to any form of challenge to what had been established as the rule. "Forgery", as it constituted counterfeit or usurpation, could then be employed to qualify the quality of the product as well as the quality of those who manufactured or sold it. To state the ‘fraudulent’ character of a thing implied mobilizing an expertise, but also to recall and endorse an authority, including and perhaps especially in a context of existing competing jurisdictions, or standards. Having said that, is this accusation based primarily on legal, economic, social or religious dimensions? Is pointing at ’fraud’ a manner of making room for obedience or prohibitions, in search of the integrity of goods, prices and services to the public, or on the contrary a manner of circumscribing a status to the happy few? Does this accusation draw lines to exclude, serve to include by means of a constrained procedure, or merely reaffirm an existing rule?

This call for papers welcomes original research spanning the whole prism of craft and commercial situations, at all scales of use of the notion of ’forgery’ - be it in a workshop, a shop, a profession, a town or a territory. Proposals may focus on one-off or recurring uses of this notion. They may examine the constituting elements of the incorporated trade, whether male, female or mixed, right through to the otherwise regulated worlds to which female labour largely belongs. As the urban environment allows for the comparative approach, this call for papers will prioritize proposals focusing on spaces that are necessarily urban, or at least undergo a process of urbanisation.

Submission guidelines

In particular, proposals may address:

  • The nature of the actors qualified as "fraud", as well as that of the actors who mobilize the notion: "fraud workers", "incompetent judges", incorporated or non-incorporated individuals, graduates or non-graduates, on the one hand, trade organizations, various municipal or supra-local bodies, on the other.
  • The materiality of objects and tools, whether in terms of inspection and expertise in workshops or factories, or the examination of products at markets, fairs and customs, including in the context of the renewal of techniques and the opening of commercial outlets.
  • Characterizing the gestures and authorizations that relate actors to goods: implementation of labour regulation, or of several competing regulations, submission to tax rubrics, rituals of inspection and registration of individuals and goods in public places or private homes.

Proposals shall be approximately 1,500 characters long, written in French or English, and are to be submitted to the following address: punirlefaux@gmail.com

by 2 February 2024

A brief résumé shall be attached.

Scientific coordination

  • Vincent Demont, Université Paris-Ouest-Nanterre
  • Mathieu Marraud, Centre de recherches historiques (CNRS-EHESS)
  • Solène Rivoal, INU Champollion d’Albi, (Université de Toulouse -UMR 5136 Framespa)

CfP: Le patrimoine colonial urbain, une histoire mémorielle (1945-2024). Dossier thématique no 9 de la "Revue d’histoire culturelle" (French)

2 months 2 weeks ago

Au terme d’un long processus, la notion de patrimoine a pu être définie, au sein du monde occidental, comme un héritage commun reposant sur la réalité physique de ses objets et donnant lieu à expertise. À ce titre, il bénéficie d’une reconnaissance juridique légitimant sa sauvegarde, de la mise en œuvre d’actions publiques pour l’étudier, le conserver, le transmettre de générations en générations. Ce dossier thématique de la « Revue d'histoire culturelle - XVIIIe-XXIe siècles » propose d’approfondir la réflexion sur les relations que les sociétés entretiennent avec le patrimoine colonial urbain depuis le milieu du XXe siècle.

Argumentaire

Ce dossier propose d’approfondir la réflexion sur les relations que les sociétés entretiennent avec le patrimoine colonial urbain depuis le milieu du XXe siècle. Au terme d’un long processus, la notion de patrimoine a pu être définie au sein du monde occidental, comme un héritage commun reposant sur la réalité physique de ses objets et donnant lieu à expertise. À ce titre, il bénéficie d’une reconnaissance juridique légitimant sa sauvegarde, de la mise en œuvre d’actions publiques pour l’étudier, le conserver, le transmettre de générations en générations. Il peut conduire à des formes de reconnaissance sentimentale, à la mise en place de rituels spécifiques, voire à des mobilisations sociales. La notion n’a cessé de s’élargir depuis les années 1980 et sa grande fluidité complexifie l’approche. L’extension du champ patrimonial a également gagné le niveau international. Le patrimoine dans la définition de l’UNESCO peut être matériel, immatériel, naturel, culturel, mixte, et de très nombreuses études, pour partie issues de l’anthropologie, ont rendu compte de cette évolution. En outre, l’existence de mouvements de patrimonialisation ou, à l’inverse, de destructions, de changements de fonction ou d’abandon dans l’indifférence, tout comme les remises en question, voire les rejets, à l’égard de la notion même de patrimoine, modifient la manière d’appréhender les questions patrimoniales.

Or, un certain nombre d’éléments de l’espace public urbain (bâtiments, statuaire, fontaines, paysages, odonymie…), issus de la colonisation européenne, et ce sur plusieurs continents, sont au cœur de débats mémoriels parfois virulents (enjeux relatifs à la domination ou à la violence coloniales) et, ce faisant, d’interrogations, de controverses, sur ce qui est patrimonialisable ou ce qui doit être dépatrimonialisé. Destructions, déboulonnages de statues illustrent de façon spectaculaire ces tensions mémorielles aussi bien dans les nations issues de la décolonisation que dans les anciennes puissances impériales et appellent une analyse comparée dans le temps et dans l’espace.

En se centrant sur l’espace public urbain depuis 1945, moment où le processus planétaire de décolonisation s’enclenche, l’objectif de ce dossier d’histoire culturelle est de faire progresser une approche historienne mêlant des études sur les acteurs, les représentations et les pratiques patrimoniales avant et après les indépendances. Il vise à mettre en exergue des évolutions dans la perception de ce patrimoine, des moments de rejet, d’indifférence, d’oubli, d’instrumentalisation politique ou économique. L’accent sera mis sur le croisement entre les interrogations relatives aux mémoires des passés coloniaux et les questionnements sur ce qui est susceptible d’entrer ou non dans le cadre patrimonial, y compris sous un angle mémoriel conflictuel.

L’attention pourra plus particulièrement se porter sur :

  • les processus de patrimonialisation ou, au contraire, de dépatrimonialisation avant et après les indépendances, à partir d’exemples pris sur tous les continents ;
  • les acteurs de ces processus, leurs conditions et les objets sur lesquels ils portent (productions architecturales publiques ou privées, places, parcs et jardins, statuaire et odonymie) ;
  • les débats liant les questions patrimoniales et mémorielles dans leurs dimensions coloniale et post-coloniale.

Direction scientifique

  • Françoise Taliano-des Garets, Science Po-Bordeaux/UMR CHS
  • Didier Nativel, Université Paris Cité/UMR CESSMA

Modalités de soumission

Soumission d’un résumé (2 500 signes maximum) et d’une brève notice bio-bibliograhique avant le 20 décembre 2023 aux trois adresses suivantes :

f.taliano@sciencespobordeaux.fr didier.nativel@u-paris.fr  revuedeladhc@gmail.com
  • Notification aux auteurs : 15 janvier 2024
  • Remise première version des articles : 1er mai 2024
  • Retour des expertises des articles : 1er juin 2024
  • Remise version 2 par les auteurs : 1er juillet 2024
  • Remise des articles complets (50 000 signes environ espaces compris) : 31 juillet 2024
  • Publication du numéro 9 de la revue : 30 septembre 2024

 

Bibliographie

  • Hamady Bocoum et Bernard Toulier, « La fabrication du Patrimoine : l’exemple de Gorée (Sénégal). In Situ. Revue des patrimoines », février 2013, no 20.
  • Chiara Bortoletto, « L’UNESCO comme arène de traduction. La fabrique globale du patrimoine immatériel », Gradhiva, 2013, 18 : 50-73.
  • Daniel Fabre, Emotions patrimoniales, MSH, ministère de la Culture, Paris, 2013.
  • Emmanuel Fureix, « Déboulonnages et dévoilements : l’histoire en morceaux ? », Écrire l’histoire, 20-21 | 2021, mis en ligne le 01 septembre 2022.
  • Alain Godonou, Christine Mengin, Jean-Pierre Duprat (dir.) Porto-Novo patrimoine et développement, PUS Ecole du patrimoine africain, 2015.
  • Odile Goerg, Xavier Huetz de Lemps, La ville coloniale (XVe-XXe siècle), Histoire de l’Europe urbaine 5, Jean-Luc Pinol (dir.), Paris, Seuil, 2003.
  • Charles Goldblum, « Réflexions à propos du patrimoine urbain en Asie du Sud-Est, sur le versant de l’« UNESCO-isation » », Moussons, 36 | 2020, 35-51.
  • Maria Gravari-Barbas et Sylvie Guichard-Anguis (dir.), Regards croisés sur le patrimoine dans le monde à l’aube du XXIe siècle, Paris, Presses universitaires de Paris Sorbonne, 2003.
  • Nabila Oulebsir, https://criham.labo.univ-poitiers.fr/membres/nabila-oulebsir/
  • Marc PaboisBernard Toulier, Architecture coloniale et patrimoine, Paris, INP, 2007.
  • Dominique Poulot, Une histoire du patrimoine en Occident XVIIIe-XXIe siècle, du monument aux valeurs, Paris, PUF 2006.
  • Pierre Singaravelou  Notre histoire(dir.), Paris, éditions du Seuil, 2023.
  • Sébastien Verney, « Spécificités et ambiguïtés du patrimoine colonial. L’exemple franco-vietnamien (1858-2014) », Revue Ethnologies, Volume 39, numéro 1, 2017, p. 155–165, Géopolitique, conflits et patrimoine.
  • Danièle Wozny, Barbara Cassin, Les intraduisibles du patrimoine en Afrique subsaharienne, Paris, Demopolis, 2016.

Voir aussi :

CfP: Prensa, democracia e integración europea, 1975-1996 (Spanish)

2 months 2 weeks ago

22-23 February 2024, Madrid

El objetivo de este coloquio internacional es acercase al proceso de integración europea y al de consolidación de la democracia en España desde la prensa, entendiendo ambos procesos como realidades que muestran un perfil singular en su dimensión de « construcciones mediáticas ». Sin ser exhaustivos, serán bien recibidas las propuestas que versen sobre los cambios materiales que tienen lugar en la estructura de la prensa española (económica o política) en relación a los procesos de democratización e integración europea ; las investigaciones que analicen los contenidos publicados en prensa acerca de cómo la idea de Europa es presentada a los españoles ; así como aquellos trabajos que estudien perfiles individuales o colectivos de las personas o grupos implicados en estos procesos.

Argumentos 

La prensa, desde su nacimiento ilustrado, se consolidó progresivamente como un actor esencial de los regímenes políticos, un agente imprescindible del espacio público, un constructor de realidades y un termómetro esencial para conocer el grado de libertades de cualquier país. En España, desde la Ley de Prensa de 1966, pero, especialmente, tras el fallecimiento del dictador, este sector va a sufrir transformaciones muy importantes, en consonancia con los cambios en un sentido democrático que se están dando entonces en el país. Sobre los periodistas se ha afirmado que contribuyeron en estos años a acercar a los ciudadanos a una nueva forma de hacer política fuera de los marcos de la dictadura, problematizando la realidad española y promoviendo una socialización política democrática anterior incluso a las elecciones de 1977 –lo que se conoce comúnmente como « el parlamento de papel »–. En este contexto, el horizonte democrático y el horizonte europeo, se funden en un mismo propósito o línea de fuga, convirtiéndose los diarios y revistas en actores imprescindibles del proceso de convergencia hacia ambos objetivos, promoviendo desde sus páginas - entre otros medios- una particular « construcción mediática » de los hechos.

El objetivo de este coloquio internacional es, precisamente, acercarse al proceso de integración europea y al de la consolidación de la democracia en España desde esta óptica, entendiendo ambos procesos como realidades que muestran un perfil singular en su dimensión de « construcciones mediáticas ». En primer lugar, nos interesa identificar qué transferencias o espacios de porosidad existieron entre las transformaciones que tienen lugar en el seno de la prensa (a nivel empresarial, en relación al mercado, con respecto al relevo generacional de la redacción, etc.), la evolución política de España y el proceso de integración europeo, en el contexto, primero, del tardofranquismo y la transición, y, segundo, de la consolidación democrática, durante la etapa de Gobierno de Felipe González y hasta la llegada a La Moncloa de José María Aznar en 1996.

En segundo lugar, queremos reconocer la manera en que la idea de Europa (como espacio utópico representante de los valores democráticos de los que adolecía España en la dictadura, o como proyecto político y económico, desde una aproximación más pragmática) es construida desde la prensa, qué visiones predominaban, qué discursos se publicaban, y cuáles eran los contornos narrativos en los que lo europeo fue presentado a los lectores.

Por último, entendemos que, además de un nivel estructural y de un nivel discursivo, los actores de estos procesos tienen una relevancia capital. Por ello, también nos interesaremos por conocer las personas implicadas y por comprender sus posiciones, sus puntos de vistas y la cualidad de sus decisiones o iniciativas en aras de rescatar las voces de los protagonistas.

Líneas de trabajo y plazos

En este sentido, queremos abrir una llamada a comunicaciones, invitando a todos los colegas interesados a hacernos llegar sus propuestas de contribuciones que encajen dentro de las coordenadas anteriormente descritas. Sin ser exhaustivos, serán bien recibidas las propuestas que versen sobre los cambios materiales que tienen lugar en la estructura de la prensa española (económica o política) en relación a los procesos de democratización e integración europea ; aquellas investigaciones que analicen los contenidos publicados en prensa acerca de cómo la idea de Europa es presentada a los españoles ; así como aquellos trabajos que estudien perfiles individuales o colectivos de las personas o grupos implicados en estos procesos.

Comité organizador

  • Rubén Cabal Tejada (Univ. de Oviedo/Uam/ Sorbonne Nouvelle)
  • Misael Arturo López Zapico (Uam)
  • Sergio Molina García (Uclm)
  • Antonio Moreno Juste (Ucm)
  • José Manuel Saenz Rotko (Univ. Pontificia de Comillas)
  • Carlos Sanz Díaz (UCM)

Modalidades de propsoiciones de peponencias

Las propuestas de comunicación (en torno a 350 palabras, incluyendo un título, y acompañadas de una breve descripción bio-bibliográfica de sus autores) deben enviarse antes del 20 de diciembre de 2023 a la siguiente dirección de correo :

ruben.cabal@uam.es

La aceptación definitiva será comunicada el 10 de enero de 2024.

El coloquio tendrá lugar los 22 y 23 de febrero de 2024. 

Información

ruben.cabal@uam.es

CfP: International friendship within and beyond the Iron Curtain

2 months 2 weeks ago

Ljubljana, 18-19 April 2024

This workshop aims to explore relations among countries both within and beyond the Iron Curtain through the lens of international friendship. Scholars are invited to explore how intersecting collective identities, trust, and emotions interact with strategic and material interests in interstate and transnational relations; and how these factors influence behavior and decision-making across various political and social levels.

International friendship within and beyond the Iron Curtain

This workshop aims to explore relations among countries both within and beyond the Iron Curtain through the lens of international friendship. In diplomatic and political history, as well as in public discourse, the term ‘friendship’ is often employed casually to describe various types of interstate relations, ranging from partnerships lacking close bonds to special relationships with dense institutionalized ties. In recent years, however, international relations scholars have acknowledged the analytical and explanatory value of international friendship, recognizing it as a relationship extending beyond conflict-free interstate dynamics. In this regard, international friendship is interpreted as a bilateral relationship that emerges from intersecting collective identities and revolves around shared projects. A friendship bond is marked by a high degree of trust and affect, embedded in close cooperation at different levels of state and society, and expressed in a range of friendship practices (Koschut&Oelsner, 2014; Berenskoetter&Van Hoef, 2017).

The intention of the workshop is to expand the research on international friendship from international relations into the realm of history, particularly by broadening the predominantly Western-focused studies within socialist and Cold War contexts. Scholars are invited to employ conceptual content on international friendship to investigate the processes of formation, maintenance, reproduction, and dissolution of friendship bonds, and to assess their impact on interactions, behaviors, and decision-making at different political and social levels. By examining specific case studies, scholars are encouraged to add valuable empirical insights to the expanding field of (international) friendship studies.

The main objectives of the workshop are to explore the identity- and trust-building processes between states and their peoples, to examine the (de)integrating and (de)mobilizing power of international friendship, and to analyze the interaction between normative factors and strategic or material interests in interstate and transnational relations.

Topics

The preferred topics may include, but are not limited to:
- Actors, such as politicians, government and party officials, cultural workers, scholars, students, entrepreneurs, activists, civil society;
- Institutions, such as government offices, cultural and professional institutions, friendship societies, student associations, business enterprises, mass organizations, and non-governmental institutions;
- Shared narratives rooted in common history, historical memory, cultural patterns, ideologies, norms, and values, and their impact on the formation of collective interstate identities;
- Shared projects aimed at a certain type of world-making, such as larger political projects (post-war reconstruction, separate roads to socialism, non-alignment, peaceful coexistence, demilitarization, political and economic decolonization) and smaller (regional) projects (joint economic enterprises, cross-border infrastructure projects, cultural ventures);
- Friendship practices, such as friendship discourses (both in private and public interactions), symbolic public displays of friendship (celebrations, commemorations), acts of solidarity, giving counsel and privileged access to information, high tolerance of ‘bad news’;
- Channels, such as diplomacy, cultural and economic cooperation, student and youth exchanges, labor exchanges, town twinning, and transnational activism.

We welcome scholars, especially from history, but also from other disciplines such as political science, political anthropology, international relations, and the like. We are looking forward to abstracts from scholars at all stages of their academic careers.

Proposals, limited to 300 words, along with a brief bio, should be submitted by 20 January 2023 to the following address: maja.lukanc@inz.si

Applicants will receive notification of the acceptance of their proposals by 15 February 2024.

The conference will take place in Ljubljana at the Institute of Contemporary History.

Accommodation in Ljubljana will be provided by the organizers.
A specific fund will be allocated for the travel expenses of researchers without institutional or project financial coverage – please indicate if needed.

Contact (announcement)

maja.lukanc@inz.si