Social and Labour History News

CfP: Continuity and Change: Rethinking African-European Encounters

1 day 11 hours ago

University of Leipzig, 18-20 July 2024

The Institute of African Studies, University of Nigeria invites scholars and students to an International Conference entitled Continuity and Change: Rethinking African-European Encounters.

Continuity and Change: Rethinking African-European Encounters

The Institute of African Studies, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, in Collaboration with the Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Conflict, University of Chicago, The Transatlantic Research Group, The Center for Igbo Studies, Dominican University, Chicago, and the Whelan Research Academy for Religion, Culture and Society, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria, invites scholars and students to an International Conference entitled Continuity and Change: Rethinking African-European Encounters. The conference is scheduled for 18-20 July 2024 with a preconference workshop on Research and Fieldwork Methodology for graduate students on 17 July 2024 at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka Campus.

The past few decades have seen intense debate on the role of European agencies in the transformation of African societies. Scholars of the African colonial experience agree that the historic arrival of Europeans in Africa, especially the colonial period, ushered in unprecedented change and transformation in African societies. What happened when Europeans encountered and mingled with African societies and people? What role did distinct categories of Europeans (Missionaries, Traders, Administrators, and Scholars) play in ensuring encounters? In what ways did Africans respond and react to this encounter? These discourses have been complicated by post-colonial studies and an increasing acceptance of African agencies in shaping the outcome of African colonial experiences. Such colonial discourses, including debates around the continuing legacies of colonial encounters, have highlighted the links between ideology, culture, and empire.

How can engagement with the history of this encounter help one speak to the present? These are the questions we will explore at the Rethinking African-European Encounters Conference, a three-day-long meeting of scholars at the Institute of African Studies, University of Nigeria.

The conference honors the life and work of Professor Felix Ekechi (1934-2023) whose illustrious historical career as a teacher and scholar centered on Africa’s engagement with Europeans. Ekechi’s most influential works include Missionary Enterprise and Rivalry in Igboland, 1857-1914 (nominated for the African Studies Association Herskovit’s Award); Tradition and Transformation in Eastern Nigeria: A Sociopolitical History of Owerri and Its Hinterland, 1902-1947; and Pioneer, Patriot, and Nigerian Nationalist, A Biography of the Reverend M.D. Opara, 1915-1965. These groundbreaking works speak to the ways European encounters with Africa shaped the history, indigenous responses, and identities.

Topics of Interest include but are not limited to:
- Control, restriction, and colonial hegemony
- Colonial Ethnography and Representation of Africa
- Construction of Identity and Difference
- Colonial Sources and Africa
- Christianity and African Spirituality
- Decolonial Thinkers and Critique of Eurocentrism
- Colonial Economic models and their aftermath
- Indigenous forms of Slavery
- Neo-slavery and other forms of servitude
- European Languages and Language Ideologies
- Labor and Production Relations
- Reproducing Colonial Political Economy
- Objects of Colonial Encounter
- Texts, Images, and Colonial Representation
- Otherness and Othering in the Colonial Context
- African Resistance and Colonial Institution
- Reinterpretations of Cultural Encounters
- Intersections of Race and Gender Biases
- Women and Colonial Ideology
- Mapping Gender in the Colonial Context

We invite scholars to send abstracts of no more than 250 words and a short biographical note (of 3-5 lines, including your current field of studies) as an attached in Microsoft Word file to ias.conference@unn.edu.ng on or before 20 May 2024. The author’s name, institutional affiliation, email address, and contact phone number should be provided under the proposed paper title before the abstract.

Successful abstracts will be announced by 27 May 2024.

Completed papers should be submitted no later than 30 June 2024.

Conference participation Fees
Participants from outside Africa: $100
Africa-based scholars and researchers: $50
Africa-based student participants: $25
Nigeria-based academics: ₦15,000
Nigeria-based student participants: ₦5,000

The conference presentation format shall be in-person and virtual.

Graduate students who are not currently holding any appointment in an institution may apply for financial support for the Research and Fieldwork Methodology workshop. Send your request to ias.conference.unn.edu.ng

All inquiries regarding submissions should be directed to ias.conference@unn.edu.ng

Prospective participants whose paper or panel proposals are accepted will be provided with further information on registration and details for payment.

Contact (announcement)

ias.conference@unn.edu.ng

CfP: Drivers of Change. Labour migrants from the Middle East, North Africa, and Turkey and social transformation in Western Europe, 1960-1990

2 days 11 hours ago

Leuven, 26-27 September 2024

 Ever since their arrival in the 1960s, labour migrants from the Middle East, North Africa, and Turkey have been drivers of change in Western European societies. Their labour was essential to Western Europe’s economic growth, while their presence rejuvenated the region’s aging demography. Simultaneously, their cultures prompted a wide array of new encounters, while their mobility was key to the transformations of Europe’s growing urban centres. Migrant communities furthermore introduced new knowledge, and their modes of religiosity added additional complexity to the position of religion in the public sphere. Finally, their precarious economic positions provoked new debates on the role of the welfare state, while their perceived ‘otherness’ challenged Eurocentric understandings of nationalisms, citizenship, social rights, and what it means to co-exist.

 Historiography is starting to recognize the transformative power of labour migrants. However, scholars note that it remains challenging to fully integrate migrants’ pivotal roles into our fundamental comprehension of social, cultural, and political change in Western Europe. The histories of migrant communities are often written in parallel with, but largely distinct from, histories of globalization, nationalisms, democratization, social movements and activisms, changing religious landscapes, technological and scientific advances, environmental awareness, …

 This workshop aims to merge these subfields and to integrate the history of post-war labour migration into a larger narrative. We welcome contributions of varied historical fields, such as urban history, decolonization studies, gender history, the history of emotions and knowledge, and the history of social movements, with a scope from 1960 to 1990. Interdisciplinary contributions from the fields of anthropology, religious studies, cultural and art studies, and social geography are also encouraged.

 Link to the full CfP

 Application deadline: 1st of May 2024

 Abstracts of ca. 350 words can be uploaded online or sent to stijn.carpentier@kuleuven.be by the 1st of May 2024.

 Accepted authors will be notified before the 1st of July 2024.

We ask them to provide a substantial working paper by the 1st of September 2024.

 

Stijn Carpentier

Doctoraal Onderzoeker
Onderzoeksgroep Moderniteit en Samenleving 1800-2000 (MoSa)

KADOC-KU Leuven

Onderzoekseenheid Geschiedenis

KU Leuven
Vlamingenstraat 39
3000 Leuven

CfP: Changing Perspectives on Resistance during the Second World War

1 week 1 day ago

From 18 to 20 September 2024, the Department of History of the University of Antwerp will host an international conference on the history of resistance during the Second World War. This conference aims to unite the wealth of perspectives and insights generated by resistance historiography since the end of the Second World War.

Changing Perspectives on Resistance during the Second World War

From 18 to 20 September 2024, the Department of History of the University of Antwerp will host an international conference on the history of resistance during the Second World War.

Almost eighty years after the end of the Second World War and after the resistance to the fascist and nazi occupiers emerged from its shadows, this conference aims to unite the wealth of perspectives and insights generated by resistance historiography during these past decades.

Submissions may involve national, local or transnational research, encompass comparative studies and microhistory, and investigate the role of gender or class in the resistance, focusing on specific individuals, activities or events. The organizing committee explicitly encourages paper proposals that go beyond these perspectives to critically examine the concept of resistance. Considering the objective to perceive the Second World War as a global conflict, they also encourage paper proposals addressing resistance outside German-occupied Europe, e.g., on the resistance against the Italian occupation of Albania or the Japanese occupation of Indonesia, or on internal resistance within these occupying powers against their fascist and nazi authorities.

The deadline for paper proposals is 15 March 2024.
Submissions should include name, primary affiliation, paper title, a 250-400 word abstract, and a short bio.
Send your paper proposals to: conferenceresistance2024@gmail.com
Find the full CfP here: https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/conferences/changing-perspectives-on-resistance-during-the-second-world-war/call/

Programm

Keynote speakers:
- Prof. Claire Andrieu (Sciences Po)
- Dr. Jelena Batinic (Stanford University)
- Prof. Emmanuel Debruyne (UCLouvain)
- Prof. em. Paula Schwartz (Middlebury College)
- Prof. Ismee Tames (Utrecht University)

Kontakt

michele.corthals@uantwerpen.be
conferenceresistance2024@gmail.com

https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/conferences/changing-perspectives-on-resistance-during-the-second-world-war/

CfP: Children and Armed Conflicts: Fates, Consequences, and Reflections

1 week 1 day ago

The peer-reviewed academic journal Acta Universitatis Carolinae – Studia Territorialia invites authors to submit articles for a special issue entitled “Children and Armed Conflicts: Fates, Consequences, and Reflections.”

Abstract submission deadline: extended to March 20, 2024.
Article submission deadline: extended to May 31, 2024.

Children and Armed Conflicts: Fates, Consequences, and Reflections

From the twentieth century to the present day, armed conflicts have increasingly affected children and influenced their fates. Children have been forced to become direct participants in wars and other forms of violent conflict. The plight of children in armed conflicts mirrors that of the adult population in many respects. Children have been killed as the result of genocidal policies and forced to become killers themselves. Between these two extremes, armed conflicts and violence have had a wide range of impacts on children’s physical and mental health, education, and upbringing. Forced migration during or subsequent to such conflicts exacerbates children’s suffering, as it delays, complicates, or even makes it impossible to relieve their suffering. Migration transfers both the children themselves and the social issues associated with them to countries that may or may not be directly involved in war. Such countries are often ill-equipped to deal with the problems of child refugees materially, institutionally, or conceptually.

This call for papers solicits contributions covering a broad, heterogeneous number of topics connected with children and armed conflicts, in the context of North America, Europe, and post-Soviet Eurasia in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Proposed subtopics may focus upon, but are not limited to:
- forms of abuse of children in particular conflicts
- war propaganda and children
- children in the military and other armed groups
- social impacts of wars and other armed violence on children
- the life of children in war zones
- orphans produced by war
- war children
- migration, child displacement, and refugee issues connected with wars
- state-organized forced deportation and “re-education” of children
- the psychopathology of war-related trauma
- international humanitarian law, child protection, and armed conflicts
- crimes against children in the context of modern armed conflicts
- international efforts to support children in armed conflicts
- the victimization of children due to war in literature, the visual arts, and cinema
- methodological trends in the research on children and armed conflicts

Submitted articles should be in English and should ideally be 6,000 to 9,000 words long (excluding footnotes and abstract). Submissions should be sent to the journal’s editorial team at stuter@fsv.cuni.cz or uploaded via Studia Territorialia’s journal management system. Authors should consult the submission guidelines on the journal’s website for further instructions and preferred style. All contributions will be subject to double-blind peer review.

Abstract submission deadline (no more than 300 words): March 20, 2024.
Notification of status and next steps: March 31, 2024.
Article submission deadline: May 31, 2024.

Acta Universitatis Carolinae – Studia Territorialia is a leading Czech peer-reviewed academic journal focusing on area studies. It covers the history and the social, political, and cultural affairs of the nations of North America, Europe, and post-Soviet Eurasia in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal is published by the Institute of International Studies of Charles University, Prague. It is indexed in the SCOPUS, ERIH PLUS, EBSCO, DOAJ, and CEEOL databases and others.

Kontakt

Acta Universitatis Carolinae – Studia Territorialia
Institute of International Studies
Charles University
U Kříže 661/8
CZ - 158 00 Prague
E-mail: stuter@fsv.cuni.cz

https://stuter.fsv.cuni.cz

CfP: Interdisciplinary Colloquium for (Post-)Doctoral Students in the field of Postcolonial and Gender Studies

1 week 1 day ago

The CePoG is organising a colloquium for (post-)doctoral students/researchers in the field of Postcolonial and Gender Studies from 20-21 June 2024. The aim is to offer young researchers working in these two fields a platform for exchange and interdisciplinary networking.

We ask those who would like to present at the colloquium to send us an abstract (max. 1500 characters incl. spaces) and the title of the master’s thesis, dissertation thesis or postdoctoral project by 31 March 2024 (to be sent to cepog@uni-trier.de). Both theoretical-methodological questions and analyses of concrete examples are welcome.

The colloquium will take place as an in-person event at the University of Trier. The organisers will endeavour to finance travel costs.

Kontakt

cepog@uni-trier.de

http://www.cepog.uni-trier.de

CfP: Cold War Internationalisms of/in the Decolonizing World

1 week 1 day ago

The Global Sixties: An Interdisciplinary Journal invites submissions for a workshop and an ensuing special thematic issue on the Internationalism of theDecolonizing World in the Cold War.

Cold War Internationalisms of/in the Decolonizing World

The Global Sixties: An Interdisciplinary Journal invites submissions for a workshop and an ensuing special thematic issue on the Internationalism of the Decolonizing World in the Cold War.

In recent decades, Cold War historiography has paid growing attention to the autonomy and agency of the players beyond the US-Soviet dichotomy. In the wake of Westad’s seminal The Global Cold War (2005), scholars have increasingly explored the episodes, events, and institutions that demonstrate the agency of the Global South. From the Bandung Conference to Pan-African networks, the so-called Third World assumes a pivotal role in the latest historiographies. Newly independent states, among others, are recast as actors in their own right and not mere pawns in a game played by two superpowers.

Cold War Internationalisms of/in the Decolonizing World advances this recentering of the narrative by focusing on decolonizing or newly independent states, along with related actors, as the makers and breakers of the Cold War world order. This special issue thus seeks to reframe the Cold War from the standpoint of Latin American, Middle Eastern, African, or Asian actors – where the US and Soviet Union appear not as the protagonists but as the dependent variables of decolonial world-making.

In addition, we seek contributions to highlight the decolonizing world’s agency in defining and/or shaping various ideologies – including, but not limited to, Communism, Socialism, Social Democracy, Nationalism, or Liberalism. We want to explore how actors from the postcolonial sphere assigned new meanings to the political vocabulary of the Cold War and created their own vocabularies.

Submissions including, but not limited to, the following topics are welcome:
- Anti-imperialist networks
- South-south diplomacies
- Biographical or multi-biographical studies
- Revolutionary organizations linked to post-colonial powers
- Women’s organizations, labor, intellectual, cultural, medical, educational, and
humanitarian groups
- Politics of anti-colonial nationalism
- Non-Soviet communisms
- International repercussions and transnational afterlives of novel variations of ideologies or stand-alone ideologies emerging from the decolonizing world (Maoism, Nasserism, Juche, Jamahiriyya, Latin American Developmentalism, Nkruhmaism, Nehruvianism, etc.)

Contributions from all levels, including graduate students and independent scholars, are greatly encouraged.

To Apply:
Prospective authors should send a short abstract (300 words) and a short bio (one paragraph) directly to Burak Sayim (burak.sayim@nyu.edu) and Severyan Dyakonov (sd3196@nyu.edu) by March 30, 2024. We will be in touch about the results by April 15.

The workshop will take place on June 5-6, 2024 at Geneva Graduate Institute. Financial support for travel and accommodation is limited.

If you are invited to submit a paper for the envisioned publication afterwards, the submission deadline for a completed manuscript is October 30, 2024.

The Global Sixties: An Interdisciplinary Journal is the only academic, peer-reviewed journal to focus solely on this transformative impact and legacies of this decade in our history. Originally launched in 2008 as The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics, and Culture, it was renamed in 2022 to account for the broader and more globally inclusive trajectory of scholarship in this area.

Generally focusing on the concept of “the long Sixties” and welcoming approaches from all disciplines, the journal addresses how this period continues to be examined and redefined across the world, encouraging global, regional, and local perspectives, as well as transnational and comparative analyses.

For more details, please visit:
https://www.globalsixtiesjournal.com/workshop-special-issue-internationalism-of-the-
decolonizing-world

Kontakt

burak.sayim@nyu.edu

https://www.globalsixtiesjournal.com/workshop-special-issue-internationalism-of-the-decolonizing-world

CfP: East and Central European Cultures in Exile. Archiving, Collecting, and Publishing in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

1 week 1 day ago

The Herder Institute Summer Academy invites Early Career Researchers, including Advanced Master Students, Ph.D. Students, and Early Postdocs, to participate in a workshop dealing with the East and Central European diaspora’s experiences of collecting, archiving, and publishing in exile.

East and Central European Cultures in Exile. Archiving, Collecting, and Publishing in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

The Herder Institute Summer Academy invites Early Career Researchers, including Advanced Master Students, Ph.D. Students, and Early Postdocs, to participate in a workshop dealing with the East and Central European diaspora’s experiences of collecting, archiving, and publishing in exile. Eastern Europe can be characterized by constant flux, with peoples, objects, andinstitutions undergoing continuous movement. From the late nineteenth century through periods of wars, revolutions, and the Cold War, various social, ethnic, religious, and political groups were compelled to migrate and exile due to poverty, catastrophes of the twentieth century, aspirations for better lives, and sometimes escaping prosecution for both trumped-up accusation and actual WWII crimes. Mass migration entails the establishment of cultural institutions in new environments, including archives, libraries, and publishing houses, which serve as mediators between cultures and their bearers, both within and outside their respective countries.

Suppressed under socialism, East European cultures sought avenues to the „free world,“ yet they were influenced by the ideological confrontation between East and West. Along with opposing the unfreedoms of Socialism in their native countries and on the global scale, publishing activities in the diaspora could include the dissemination of far-right and radical nationalist ideas. Furthermore, conflicts, recriminations, suspicions, and financial quarrels were not rare and they occupied a visible place in émigré publications. How can we critically engage with this heritage while paying attention to its diversity and historical significance?

The Summer Academy will delve into the publishing and collecting initiatives that emerged across Europe and the world following World War II, continuing into the late 1980s.

Equally crucial is the issue of preservation and accessibility, which can be facilitated through digitization. However, the challenge lies in how to approach and digitally connect the scattered multicultural and multilingual collections.

Against the backdrop of Russia’s ongoing aggressive war in Ukraine and mounting repressions in Belarus and Russia, East European cultures find themselves once again facing exile and emigration, while the Cold War experience of émigré activities at archiving, collecting, and publishing regain its relevance.

With its extensive archival materials, including the unique Urbańczyk collection of the Polish underground press from the era of Solidarność, the newspaper clippings archive from the Cold War period, and the comprehensive periodicals archive covering Eastern and Central Europe, the Herder Institute provides an exceptional foundation for this thematic focus, which will be explored through various theoretical and practical thematic units.

We invite submissions for 10-15 Minutes Paper presentations on the topics, including, but not limited to:
- Publishing Houses in exile: national and transnational perspectives
- The variety of émigré and publishing and collecting activities and how they affect the production of knowledge on Eastern Europe during the Cold War and after
- (Re)creation of national cultures in exile Intercultural connections and collections in the diasporas
- New and old diasporas’ approaches to publishing and collecting: continuity or rupture?
- The role of digital publishing and archiving techniques for enhancing access to émigré collections and archives

Send your exposé (approx. 300 words) and a short CV to
forum@herder-institut.de
until April 30, 2024.
Accomodation for selected participants will be provided and travel costs up to 250 Euro (EU), 500 Euro (Non-EU), 800 Euro (overseas travels) can be covered upon request.

Kontakt

Dr. Tatsiana Astrouskaya (tatsiana.astrouskaya@herder-institut.de), Dr. Denisa Nešťáková (denisa.nestakova@herder-institut.de)

https://www.herder-institut.de/event/call-for-papers-east-and-central-european-cultures-in-exile/

CfP: Trust and Distrust of Historical Sources in the Digital Age

1 week 1 day ago

The Women, Gender & Sexuality Network of the SSHA calls for papers and panels for the 50th annual meeting of the Social Science History Association in Toronto CA from Oct. 31- Nov. 3, 2024.

Trust and Distrust of Historical Sources in the Digital Age

The Women, Gender and Sexuality Network of the Social Science History Association calls for papers and panels for the 50th annual meeting in Toronto, CA from Oct. 31 -Nov. 3, 2024.

This year's theme is "Trust and Distrust of Historical Sources in the Digital Age" but all Social Science History themes from a gender and sexuality perspective welcome.

50th SSHA in Toronto 2024
31 October – 3 November 2024

Submission Deadline: 23 February 2024

Official CfP “Trust and Distrust of Historical Sources in the Digital Age”: https://ssha.org/files/2024_SSHA_CFP.pdf

Call for WGS panels and critics:

Halloween: creepy, scary, sexy?
Evil clowns can be creepy, witches can be scary, but Halloween can also be sexy. In this panel we are looking for papers with sex/gender/queer perspectives on Halloween. Your contribution can be about nearly anything - costumes, histories, data, media representation, fantasies and more - as long as the audience is getting goosebumps.

Possible panel themes:
- 50 years of SSHA: Looking back at how Women Gender and Sexuality Studies evolved at SSHA and beyond, and at how WGS scholarship has been repeatedly challenged from within.
- Perceptions of women in seminal literary works (current to 50 years ago, with focus on different geographical areas).
- Revisiting digital humanities (e.g. born digital histories of women in the Red Power movement).
- Halloween related themes, e.g. histories of witchcraft, witches in popular culture, burning witches’ tropes, Walpurgis Night, Baba Yaga, The Little Witch by Otfried Preussler, esoterisms; gender and queer histories of costumes and dressing up and/as gender, etc.).
- Gender relations in visual and performing arts institutions (e.g. gender relations behind and on the stage of the theater).
- Cultural & science histories of the body or body parts: breast? vulva? hymen?
- Sexualities

Possible roundtable themes:
- Trust and distrust in digital sources in Women, Gender and Sexuality studies.
- Similarities and Differences of “Anti-Intellectual”, “Ani-Gender”, “Anti-Critical-Race”, “Anti-Postcolonial”, “Anti-Woke” and “Cancel Culture”-debates and movements in Europe, North America and beyond.

How to submit:
- We encourage you to organize a full panel (3-4 papers, optional discussant), but individual papers will be accepted as well. You may also submit “Author meets Critics”-sessions or roundtables.
- Send paper abstracts to network representatives or submit directly to conference. If you submit a panel, we need a panel title, names, affiliation and email of authors, abstracts of each planned paper as well as the names of discussants and chairs.
- We are happy to help you find/contact scholars as authors, discussants and chairs.

Please reach out to the WGS network chairs:
Jadwiga, Martin, and Dominique

dominique.grisard@unibas.ch
jadwiga@u.arizona.edu
martin.goessl@fh-joanneum.at

Kontakt

Women, Gender and Sexuality Network representatives (Dominique.grisard@unibas.ch)

https://ssha.org

CfP: Punish and Rehabilitate through Work

1 week 1 day ago

Call for Abstracts
Punish and Rehabilitate through Work: Institutions, Discourses, and Agency in Central, Eastern, and Western Europe at the End of the 19th and in the first half of the 20th century

Institute of History, Czech Academy of Sciences
Leibniz Institute for the History and Culture of Eastern Europe, GWZO
German Historical Institute Warsaw
Faculty of Humanities, Charles University

Date: November 13–15, 2024

Punish and Rehabilitate through Work: Institutions, Discourses, and Agency in Central, Eastern, and Western Europe at the End of the 19th and in the first half of the 20th century

Workhouse, house of correction, reformatory, forced labour colony, disciplinary labour camp, etc. – these are only a few designations of the disciplinary institutions that proliferated across Eastern, Central, and Western Europe during the late 19th and in the first half of the 20th century. These disciplinary institutions served a dual purpose of confinement as well as correction. Behind their walls or within their compounds, citizens who deviated from the prevailing middle-class norms of “proper work” and “decent behaviour” were confined as well as corrected by making use of their labour. The declared aim of such institutions, whose tradition dates back to the early modern period, was therefore not only to punish individuals whose mobility, livelihood and other types of conduct were criminalised, but also to turn “alcoholics”, “beggars”, “delinquents”, “pimps”, “prostitutes”, and “vagrants”, to name only a few groups who were targeted, into “orderly citizens”.

The majority of existing research has focused on the 18th and 19th centuries and the role of the continental as well as the English workhouse in Western Europe in relation to nascent capitalism. Therefore, shifting the focus on the late 19th and the first half of the 20th century opens up new possibilities for inquiring into the continuities and discontinuities of the practices and functions of previously established or newly created disciplinary institutions that were intended to provide additional punishment while simultaneously correcting the allegedly deviant subjects through labour. In particular, the regions of Central and Eastern Europe underwent significant political, social and economic development during this period. This development included the transition from semi-peripheral regions of empires to nation-states and many turbulent transformations of political regimes, encompassing liberal and popular democracies, authoritarian regimes as well as Nazi and state-socialist dictatorships. The political transformations often went hand in hand with significant economic fluctuations, such as the Great Depression or the two world conflicts. In addition, various social and penal reforms were introduced during this period, which had serious repercussions on the idea of who and how should be punished and/or rehabilitated through work.

In this workshop, we aim to bring together scholars from various fields, mainly experts in the history of social policies, history of convict or forced labour, histories of diverse marginalised or criminalised groups, history of criminology and penal law, and history of prisons and prison reform. Our intention is to explore the locally diverse disciplinary institutions such as continental workhouses, reformatories for young offenders, forced labour camps, etc. from various perspectives. These institutions could be located at the nexus of confinement, labour, and rehabilitation. They were embedded in a wider net of penal, social and economic measures and at the same time debated in expert circles as well as on the pages of the popular press. We also want to overcome the fact that the historiography of these various institutions remains very much focused on Western Europe, captive to national narratives, mostly overlooking institutions designed for women and often fragmented among a variety of research perspectives that overlap with each other only sporadically. Finally, in order to see possible innovations in this research field, we want to discuss the existing concepts (including disciplination, forced labour, and convict labour) that serve to interpret the meaning of these institutions and the methods and sources which could be used in order to reconstruct the everyday life of men and women assigned to these institutions as well as to re-examine the institutions’ role in confining specific groups of inhabitants, namely the Roma and Sinti.

Issues we would like contributors to address in the workshop are:

1. INSTITUTIONS AND ACTORS
What functions did these disciplinary institutions perform in the broader context of social processes of exclusion and inclusion?
How did the constitutive tension between the rehabilitation and confinement of inmates affect the position of these institutions within gradually diverging systems of punishment and social welfare?
Which actors (e.g. different bodies of the state, municipalities, churches, private companies etc.) were involved in different aspects of these institutions and in which ways?

2. IDEAS AND PRACTICES
How to interpret the relationship between the diverse contemporary discourses of rehabilitation and punishment, and the changing practice of the disciplinary institutions such as continental workhouses, forced labour camps and reformatories?
What role did the disciplinary institutions play in the discourses and imaginations of social outcasts, especially those who were labelled as “Gypsies”?
Did these popular as well as expert ideas and discourses shape the practice?

3. INMATES AND STAFF
Who actually were the people confined in these institutions, in terms of their age, gender, class, professions, ethnicity, nationality, etc.?
Why were they confined and in what ways were they deemed to need reforming?
Who was recruited as staff in the disciplinary institutions and how?

4. LABOUR AND ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY
What kinds of labour were used to correct male and female convicts and what concepts (e.g. forced labour or convict labour) could be used in order to capture the complexities of penal and economic goals?
How were the inmates’ conditions negotiated in relation to the labour market, wages, etc. in the outside world?

5. EVERYDAY LIFE AND METHODOLOGY
What were the living conditions and everyday life of the inmates and how did the everyday life of male and female convicts differ?
How were the social hierarchies and order negotiated by the inmates and the staff?
What types of sources and methods can be used in order to reconstruct everyday life and to capture the agency of the inmates and how?

6. (DIS-)CONTINUITIES
How did these disciplinary institutions change over time?
What role did the agency of inmates play in particular?
How were they influenced by political development of the state or local administrations?
We especially welcome scholars who deal with these topics in the context of Central and Eastern Europe and/or apply innovative qualitative and/or quantitative methods and approaches.
Our plan is to publish an edited volume.

Workshop language: English.

Organisers:
Pavel Baloun (Institute of History, Czech Academy of Sciences / Faculty of Humanities, Charles University)
Lucie Dušková (Leibniz Institute for the History and Culture of Eastern Europe, GWZO)
Jaromír Mrňka (German Historical Institute Warsaw)
Klára Pinerová (Institute of History, Czech Academy of Sciences)
Jiří Smlsal (Institute of History, Czech Academy of Sciences)

Deadlines:
- Abstract Submission (max. 300 words with short bio): April 4, 2024
- Communicating Acceptance: April 22, 2024. Selected participants will be invited to submit a paper of 3,000–5,000 words as a basis for the book chapter.
- Paper Submission: September 30, 2024
- Submit Abstracts to prworkshop2024@hiu.cas.cz

Venue: Prague.

Keynote Speaker:
Sigrid Wadauer (University of Vienna)

Kontakt

prworkshop2024@hiu.cas.cz

CfP: Scandals and Politicization of (Anti)Corruption. From Loyal Subjects to Mass Politics (14th - 20th Centuries)

1 week 1 day ago

Barcelona, 12-13 December 2024

This international workshop aims to consider the politicizing potential of scandals. Here, politicization is understood broadly as all the notions and ideas that make people have political awareness and help them define the sphere of the political. They foster public outrage, but proposalsand solutions can be alternative and even antagonistic. Considering scandals throughout different national and chronological frames, from the admonitionsfound in the mirrors for princes (specula principum) to mass demonstrations in the interwar years, by way of the causes célèbres of the Ancien Régime, the aim is to encourage historiographical debate on the capacity of political scandals to mobilize all social classes, revise social values and influence individuals’ ideologies.

Argument

Abuses of power, obscene crimes, heretic behaviours, violent anathemas, in short, any act or speech transgressing established norms, have shocked societies over the centuries, depending on each historical context. Whether the focus was on the courts, chancelleries, or bishoprics of ancient regime polities or parliamentary institutions of Liberal States, scandals exposed the limits of collective tolerance towards political deviations and the questioning of moral values and public ethics. In this sense, studying corruption scandals is an opportunity to understand how power relations and politicization function. Once corrupt practices are revealed, the breakout of a scandal can erode politic alauthority and legitimacy. Hence, the status quo is challenged, and the power is scrutinized.

In turn, contesting governance has not always entailed a desire for justice. The ideals of reparation, demands for profound reforms, the struggle for transparency or citizens’ demands for clarification of the facts may initially have been motivated by factionalism or partisan interests. Anti-corruption rhetoric may have disguised unhealthy sentiments such as revenge. It could also be achannel for public notoriety or private gain. Similarly, scandals could be instrumentalized depending on the objectives and goals: to stabilize government power, to serve as a corrective tool, or as a pretext to overthrow the regime. In any case, they could affect the very structures of power.

Based on all these assumptions, this international workshop aims to consider the politicizing potential of scandals. Here, politicization is understood broadly as all the notions and ideas that make people have political awareness and help them define the sphere of the political. They foster public outrage, but proposals and solutions can be alternative and even antagonistic. Considering scandals throughout different national and chronological frames, from the admonitions found in the mirrors for princes (specula principum) to mass demonstrations in the interwar years, by way of the causes célèbres of the Ancien Régime, the aim isto encourage historiographical debate on the capacity of political scandals tomobilize all social classes, revise social values and influence individuals’ ideologies.

For this reason, participants are compelled to submit proposals privileging the following themes:

- Political cultures and the fight against corruption.

- Religiousness, corrupted politics and the common good.

- Reasons and aims for denouncing misbehaviour in office.

- Rumours, popular claims, and the making/spreading of scandals.

- Scandals as political narratives.

- Comparative cases throughout history.

Submission guidelines

We welcome proposals of ca. 500 words concerning the topics mentioned above along with a short CV. The proposals must be sent to Scandalspolitization@gmail.com.

before the 1st of June 2024

The decision on the received proposals will beannounced on the 31st of July 2024. The contributions presented during the workshop will be collected for publication by a leading publisher.

Scientific Committee
  • Dr Joan Pubill-Brugués (Margarita Salas Fellow, Universtat Autònoma de Barcelona)
  • Dr Ricard Torra-Prat (Beatriu de Pinós Fellow, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)
  • Prof Dr Maria Gemma Rubí Casals (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

CfP: Images, travail et handicap Revue « Images du travail-travail des images », n° 19 (French)

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Ce numéro d’ITTI propose d’interroger ce que les images peuvent révéler du travail au prisme des droits et des expériences des personnes handicapées.

AAP pour le n° 19 de la revue « Images du travail, travail des images » (septembre 2025)

Argumentaire

A partir des années 1960, l’évolution de la législation sur le travail des personnes handicapées s’inscrit dans un mouvement international d’émergence de leurs droits porté par les disability studies (Ravaud, 1999). Il remet en cause le modèle individuel et biomédical du handicap pour le redéfinir comme « modèle social » imputant la production du handicap à la société (ses structures, ses organisations) et non plus à la personne. Au niveau international, deux séries d’acteurs institutionnels ont joué un rôle décisif. D’une part, l’OMS (Organisation mondiale de la Santé) défend une approche biomédicale du handicap, mais fait entrer la dimension environnementale en révisant ses classifications, concédant ainsi une avancée vers le « modèle social ». D’autre part, l’ONU (Organisation des nations unies), puis le Conseil de l’Europe, relaient les revendications plus radicales des mouvements militants adossées au travail conceptuel des disability studies, qui promeuvent le « modèle social » (Ravaud & Fougeyrollas, 2005).

En France, la loi 2005-102 du 11 février 2005, « pour l'égalité des droits et des chances, la participation et la citoyenneté des personnes handicapées » intègre des aspects de ce « modèle social ». Ainsi, c’est désormais au monde du travail de prendre les mesures nécessaires pour permettre aux personnes concernées une pleine « participation sociale », autour de deux piliers essentiels que sont l’accessibilité et la compensation. La politique publique en faveur de l’emploi et du travail des personnes handicapées articule des mesures de discrimination positive avec les quotas d’emploi à des mesures antidiscriminatoires « d’aménagements raisonnables » consistant à adapter les postes de travail en fonction des besoins des personnes (Lejeune et al., 2017). Dans le monde francophone occidental, les années 2000 ont été propices à des avancées législatives relativement convergentes. Le Québec, pionnier, disposait depuis la loi du 23 juin 1978 « assurant l’exercice des droits des personnes handicapées » d’un Office des Personnes Handicapées du Québec aux pouvoirs consistants, obligeant la société. La loi du 17 décembre 2004 qui révise celle de 1978, renforce les pouvoirs de l’OPHQ et implique plus fortement les organismes de droit commun. Sans recourir aux quotas d’emplois comme en France, elle instaure des plans pluriannuels d’intégration et de maintien dans l’emploi à l’égard desquels le gouvernement doit rendre des comptes[1]. En Suisse, une loi fédérale dite « Loi sur l’égalité pour les handicapés, LHand » est votée le 13 décembre 2002 par l’Assemblée fédérale de la Confédération. Elle prévoit un cadre légal antidiscriminatoire à l’embauche et encourage les mesures d’accessibilité aux lieux de travail. En Belgique, la loi du 10 mai 2007 « tendant à lutter contre certaines formes de discrimination » prévoit une politique générale antidiscriminatoire pour l’accès à l’emploi, les conditions de travail, le maintien dans l’emploi, passant notamment par des « aménagements raisonnables ». Plus récemment, sans précédent dans l’histoire des droits des personnes handicapées, le parlement belge approuve le 12 mars 2021 une révision de la Constitution consacrant le droit des personnes handicapées à une participation pleine et entière à la société.

Pour autant, 20 ans après la loi française du 11 février 2005, les caractéristiques et les conditions d’emploi des personnes handicapées sont loin d’être homogénéisées avec celles de la population générale (Agefiph, 2022). Les travailleurs et travailleuses handicapé·es sont plus âgé·es et moins diplômé·es. Leur accès à l’emploi est sensiblement plus difficile. L’éventail de leurs métiers est réduit et ils et elles sont sous représenté·es dans les emplois des catégories intermédiaires et supérieures et surreprésenté·es dans les emplois subalternes (Bernardi & Lhommeau, 2020). Des enquêtes en sciences sociales viennent documenter les divers processus qui perpétuent des logiques inégalitaires et discriminatoires (par exemple : Boudinet, 2021, 2021 ; Dessein, 2022 ; Gardien, 2006 ; Lejeune, 2019, 2021 ; Revillard, 2017 ; Roupnel-Fuentes, 2021 ; Segon, 2021 ; Valdes, 2022).

Parallèlement, le changement de perspective qui s’est cristallisé dans la loi de 2005 a fait passer la personne handicapée du statut d’objet (de soins, d’aides) au statut de sujet (de son existence). Le « projet de vie » prévu par la loi en est l’instrument. Il doit être élaboré à partir de besoins formulés par la personne concernée ou, avec ou pour elle, par son représentant légal lorsqu’elle ne peut exprimer son avis. Il enjoint les professionnels du handicap à considérer la personne handicapée comme « actrice de son projet de vie » et à l’accompagner non plus à partir de ses déficiences, mais bien de ses capacités (Jacques, 2017). Plusieurs conséquences découlent de cette nouvelle propension des personnes handicapées à pouvoir s’affirmer en tant que personnes.

La première de ces conséquences est une visibilité accrue du handicap. Autrefois cantonné aux institutions ségrégatives et donc isolé du monde social (Pinell & Zafiropoulos, 1983), le handicap dans ses différentes formes se montre désormais. En témoignent, par exemple : le Festival National du Court Métrage Handica[2] ; la campagne publicitaire de CAP48[3] de 2010 affichant Tanja Klewitz, mannequin belge à qui il manque un avant-bras, posant « belle et handicapée »[4] en sous-vêtements ; les Jeux paralympiques donnant à voir des corps handicapés en tant que corps performants ; ou encore la promesse du président de la République de doter dès 2023 chaque département d’exosquelettes pour le réapprentissage de la marche des patients médullo- ou cérébro-lésés[5]. En contrepoint à ce coup de projecteur sur les corps handicapés, les « handicaps invisibles » sont également mis en lumière dans les discours : ils seraient la face immergée de l’iceberg dans la mesure où, selon les associations militantes, 80% des situations de handicap relèveraient de handicaps invisibles. À l’instar de l’étude fondatrice de Goffman (1975), les enjeux de visibilisation du handicap se révèlent ainsi décisifs (par exemple : Dalle-Nazébi & Kerbourc’h, 2013 ; Lejeune & Yazdanpanah, 2017 ; Segon, 2021).

Seconde conséquence de l’affirmation des personnes handicapées en tant que telles dans l’espace public, leurs revendications se structurent désormais au-delà des associations traditionnelles d’aide aux familles, sous la forme de groupements, de syndicats[6], de fédérations dirigés, encadrés, animés par les personnes handicapées. Un mouvement tel que « Ni pauvre, ni soumis » fondé en 2008 réunit par exemple une quarantaine d’associations et revendique la création d’un revenu d’existence décent pour les personnes handicapées qui ne peuvent pas ou plus travailler[7]. De plus, la normalisation du handicap produit de nouvelles normes partagées. À rebours d’une charge pour la société, le handicap se « désinsularise » et pourrait devenir pourvoyeur d’innovations potentiellement bénéfiques pour le plus grand nombre (Gardou & Poizat, 2007), en particulier dans l’environnement de travail.

L’entrée par les images du travail apparait ainsi particulièrement propice pour saisir les effets de la loi de 2005 sur le travail. Après deux décennies sous son égide, comment penser la relation entre handicap, travail et emploi, à partir des images du travail ? Une exploration rapide par les mots clés « handicap » et « travail » sur les moteurs de recherche généralistes est à première vue peu productive : prédominent des représentations du travail en col blanc, au bureau (tables, chaises, ordinateurs, tableaux, salles de réunion, etc.) et des représentations du handicap principalement par le fauteuil roulant qu’il s’agisse de personnes photographiées ou du pictogramme. Mais un regard plus attentif dessine une grande variété de pistes et de corpus envisageables autour de la thématique proposée, comme le révèlent quelques exemples. Un corpus médiatique (le média en ligne Konbini) montre des personnes concernées, face caméra, exprimant leurs aspirations et livrant leurs expériences des discriminations au travail[8]. Un corpus institutionnel (la FEBRAP : Fédération bruxelloise des entreprises du secteur adapté) rassemble des vidéos destinées aux employeurs et employeuses (par exemple comment communiquer avec des personnes déficientes intellectuelles) ou aux travailleurs et travailleuses (par exemple quel comportement adopter au travail), donnant ce faisant à voir des situations de travail concrètes. Enfin, dans un récent numéro de la revue ITTI, un article montre un bucheron en fauteuil après un accident de la route, révélant ce qu’il inflige à son corps pour continuer son activité comme avant, mais également des innovations techniques développées pour adapter sa pratique à sa situation (Plesse-Colucci & Schepens, 2023).

Les perspectives les plus contemporaines en sciences sociales aussi bien qu’historiques, articulées ou non avec des approches juridiques, les aires géographiques francophones aussi bien qu’au-delà, seront les bienvenues pour contribuer à cette réflexion. Les corpus mobilisés pourront être, sans exclusive : des corpus institutionnels publics (images issues des documents de communication des organismes militants, associations gestionnaires, événements et autres institutions dédiées au handicap), des archives privées ou publiques (par exemple l’Institut national de l’audiovisuel), des corpus publicitaires ou médiatiques, de la documentation iconographique technique (illustrant les matériels ou les plans adaptatifs, supplétifs, ergonomiques), des images produites dans le cadre de recherches.

Ce numéro d’ITTI propose d’interroger ce que les images peuvent révéler du travail au prisme des droits et des expériences des personnes handicapées, autour de deux axes principaux.

Axe 1 : la représentation du handicap au travail

Comment le handicap au travail est-il représenté ? Que disent ces représentations de la place et des droits des personnes handicapées dans la société ? Quelle place les représentations majoritairement centrées sur les handicaps visibles laissent-elles aux images d’autres handicaps en situation de travail ? Quelles innovations ou solutions techniques et humaines ont-elles émergé des préconisations législatives et comment sont-elles montrées ? Comment la compensation, l’accessibilité, les aménagements raisonnables, les approches capacitantes sont-elles (in)visibilisées ? Avec quelles intentions ou quels effets ?

Axe 2 : le point de vue des personnes handicapées sur le travail

Quel point de vue le handicap construit-il sur le travail ? Comment les personnes handicapées voient-elles le travail, ce qu’il est, ce qu’elles en font et ce qu’il leur fait ? Dans quelle mesure la situation de handicap révèle-t-elle certains aspects du « travail ordinaire » ? En quoi la représentation du travail du point de vue des personnes handicapées contribue-t-elle à leur appropriation d’un poste de travail, à leur insertion dans un collectif de travail ou encore à la construction d’une identité de travailleur ou de travailleuse ?

Trois entrées, sans exclusive, pourront contribuer à l’un ou l’autre axe :

  1. Travailleurs handicapés en action : personnes, parcours, contextes, collectifs, gestes et réalisations, compétences, militances.
  2. Accompagnements, compensations, mises en accessibilité en train de se faire : outils, environnements, postures, innovations.
  3. Permanence des exclusions professionnelles, représentations défectologiques, vecteurs d’inaccessibilité.
Modalités de contribution

Les propositions reposeront sur l’analyse d’images qui doivent pouvoir être reproduites dans l’article. L’auteur doit s’assurer de la disposition des droits d’utilisation et de diffusion. Les articles sont d’un format de 30 000 à 50 000 signes maximum. Dans un premier temps sont attendues des propositions d’articles sous forme d’un texte d’intention de 2000 à 3000 signes espaces compris, qui exposera l’inscription disciplinaire et les éléments centraux du cadre théorique de la recherche, le type d’images support et leur mode de production, la méthodologie du travail d’enquête présenté, les grands résultats.

  • Propositions d’articles : 1 mars 2024
  • Retour sur les propositions d’article : 1 avril 2024
  • Articles : 30 septembre 2024

Contacts pour toutes informations complémentaires et pour l’envoi des documents :

Coordinateurs
  • Fabienne Montmasson-Michel, MCF de sociologie, Université de Poitiers
  • Christian Papinot, PU de sociologie, Université de Poitiers
Évaluation

Processus d’évaluation en double aveugle détaillé dans les consignes aux auteur.es à l’adresse suivante : https://journals.openedition.org/itti/1353

Bibliographie

Agefiph. (2022). Tableau de bord national. Emploi-chômage des personnes handicapées — 1er semestre 2022. Observatoire de l’emploi des personnes. https://www.agefiph.fr/sites/default/files/medias/fichiers/2022-10/Agefiph-TB-2022_8G_0.pdf

Bernardi, V., & Lhommeau, B. (2020). Quelles sont les spécificités des professions occupées par les personnes handicapées ? Dares Analyses, 31. https://dares.travail-emploi.gouv.fr/sites/default/files/pdf/dares_analyses_professions_personnes_handicapee.pdf

Boudinet, M. (2021). Sortir d’ESAT ? Les travailleur·ses handicapé·e·s en milieu protégé face à l’insertion en milieu ordinaire de travail. Formation emploi, n° 154(2), 137‑156. https://doi.org/10.4000/formationemploi.9294

Dalle-Nazébi, S., & Kerbourc’h, S. (2013). L’invisibilité du « travail en plus » de salariés sourds. Terrains & travaux, 23(2), 159‑177. https://doi.org/10.3917/tt.023.0159

Dessein, S. (2022). Juger l’employabilité des chômeurs handicapés à travers le prisme d’une logique de performance. Une analyse ethnographique et statistique du tri des usagers à l’entrée du service public Cap emploi. Revue des politiques sociales et familiales, 142‑143(1), 5‑21. https://doi.org/10.3917/rpsf.142.0005

Gardien, È. (2006). Travailleur en situation de handicap : De qui parle-t-on ? Pour une analyse des situations partagées. Reliance, 19(1), 50‑59. https://doi.org/10.3917/reli.019.59

Gardou, C., & Poizat, D. (2007). Désinsulariser le handicap : Quelles ruptures pour quelles mutations culturelles ? Erès.

Goffman, E. (1975). Stigmate. Minuit.

Jacques, M.-H. (2017). La ‘’relation au bénéficiaire’’ dans les ‘‘nouveaux métiers du handicap’’ : une relation de clientèle ? In M.-H. Lechien, F. Neyrat, & A. Richard, Sociologie de la relation de clientèle. Pulim, 179-193.

Lejeune, A. (2019). Travailler avec un handicap. Idéal d’inclusion et inégalités face au droit. Savoir/Agir, 47(1), 53‑62. https://doi.org/10.3917/sava.047.0053

Lejeune, A. (2021). Postface. Handicap et inégalités. Formation emploi, n° 154(2), 197‑203. https://doi.org/10.4000/formationemploi.9383    

Lejeune, A., Hubin, J., Ringelheim, J., Robin-Olivier, S., Schoenaers, F., Yazdanpanah, H., Fillion, E., & Thivet, D. (2017). Handicap et aménagements raisonnables au travail : Importation et usages d’une catégorie juridique en France et en Belgique [Rapport de recherche]. Mission de recherche Droit et Justice ; CERAPS, Université de Lille. https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01625329

Lejeune, A., & Yazdanpanah, H. (2017). Face au handicap : Action syndicale et cadrages juridiques. Politix, n° 118(2), 55‑76. https://doi.org/10.3917/pox.118.0055

Pinell, P., & Zafiropoulos, M. (1983). Un siècle d’échecs scolaires : 1882-1982. Éditions ouvrières.

Plesse-Colucci, A., & Schepens, F. (2023). Quand la photographie révèle l’innovation technique. Images du travail, travail des images, 15, Article 15. https://doi.org/10.4000/itti.4298

Ravaud, J.-F. (1999). Modèle individuel, modèle médical, modèle social : La question du sujet. Handicap. Revue de sciences humaines et sociales, 81, 64‑75. https://hal.science/hal-02264281/document

Ravaud, J.-F., & Fougeyrollas, P. (2005). La convergence progressive des positions franco-québécoises. Santé, Société et Solidarité, 4(2), 13‑27. https://doi.org/10.3406/oss.2005.1047

Revillard, A. (2017). La réception des politiques du handicap : Une approche par entretiens biographiques. Revue française de sociologie, Vol. 58(1), 71‑95. https://doi.org/10.3917/rfs.581.0071

Roupnel-Fuentes, M. (2021). La formation pour prévenir la désinsertion professionnelle des travailleur·s·es handicapé·e·s ? Formation emploi, n° 154(2), 113‑135. https://doi.org/10.4000/formationemploi.9416

Segon, M. (2021). Révéler, dévoiler, c’est décidé, je le mets ! Candidater en signalant son statut de « travailleur handicapé ». Formation emploi, n° 154(2), 65‑86. http://doi.org/10.4000/formationemploi.9270

Valdes, B. (2022). Les référents handicap dans la fonction publique, des missions variées dans un contexte encore peu professionnalisé. Revue française des affaires sociales, 1, 109‑131. https://doi.org/10.3917/rfas.221.0109

Notes

[1] Gouvernement du Québec. (2019). Stratégie nationale pour l’intégration et le maintien en emploi des personnes handicapées 2019-2024. Gouvernement du Québec. https://cdn-contenu.quebec.ca/cdn-contenu/adm/min/emploi-solidarite-sociale/publications-adm/rapport/STRAT_snph_2019-2024_MTESS.pdf

[2] Dreyer, P., & Raymond, V. (2006, mai 4). La représentation des personnes handicapées au cinéma : Quels regards pour quels enjeux ? Handicap.fr. https://informations.handicap.fr/a--1935.php

[3] Événement de collecte de dons via la RTBF (radiotélévision belge francophone) pour les recherches médicales sur les handicaps.

[4] Mallaval, C. (2010, octobre 8). Belle et handicapée : En Belgique, l’affiche qui ose. https://www.liberation.fr/vous/2010/10/08/belle-et-handicapee-en-belgiq…

[5] Dal’Secco, E. (2023, janvier 26). Macron promet de déployer 2 exosquelettes par département. Handicap.fr. https://informations.handicap.fr/a-macron-deux-exosquelettes-par-departement-34337.php

[6] Par exemple l’union professionnelle des travailleurs indépendants handicapées (UPTIH), créée en 2008 et devenue H’up entrepreneurs en 2018.

[7] http://www.nipauvrenisoumis.org/

[8] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqP2xKHoeIE&ab_channel=Konbini

CfP: Activists in Exile. Gender, Political Commitment and Migration in the Twentieth Century

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 National Archives of Belgium (Brussels), 24 September 2024

The aim of the symposium is to highlight recent developments in research on migrant activists, exploring the interactions between gender, political commitment and migration in the twentieth century. Proposals may focus on women's engagement, masculinities or gender relations in militant contexts. How does gender influence militancy in migration? And how do political commitment and migration influence gender relations and the construction of femininity and masculinity?

Symposium organised in collaboration with the Forum for Belgian research on history of women, gender and sexuality (AVG-CARHIF) and the BRAIN project (Belspo) WomenExile: Gendering political exile in Belgium (1918-1958).

Argument

Twenty years ago, a special issue of the journal Sextant was published on "Migrant Women" (Gubin and Morelli, 2004), followed five years later by a new issue on "Women in Political Exile" (Morelli, 2009). In these two volumes, the contributors noted both the need for historical research to consider the singularity of female exile (Gubin and Piette, 2009), and the many methodological difficulties of uncovering migrant women in institutional archives (Gillen, 2004). For the female political exiles who are the subject of the second volume, their invisibility in the sources is coupled with their non-recognition as activists, a reflection of their illegitimacy in male political circles (Gubin and Piette, 2009). At a time when the history of migration had shown little interest in women, the two volumes of Sextant highlighted the many facets of women's mobility, and challenged the representation of women as mere "victims", highlighting their ability to make the best of difficult situations, to forge links of solidarity, to organise themselves, to emancipate themselves, and so on.

The desire of the editors of Sextant to bring together the history of women and migration was shared by other historians. The interaction between these two fields of research intensified from the 2000s onwards (Schrover 2008, Guerry 2009, Green 2013, Schrover and Moloney, 2013), as is demonstrated by the publication of a special issue on gender by the International Migration Review in 2006 and a special issue on migration by Gender & History in 2019. In Belgium, Jaarboek voor Vrouwengeschiedenis had already published an issue on the subject in 2001, while Tijdschrift voor Sociale en Economische Geschiedenis devoted a special issue to gender, migration and government policies in 2008.

Many avenues still need to be explored: feminist perspectives on migration and social and political engagement continue to be enriched by new fieldwork and new grids of interpretation.

The aim of this conference is to highlight recent developments in research on migrant activists, exploring the interactions between gender, political commitment and migration in the 20th century. Proposals may focus on women's involvement as well as on masculinities or gender relations in an activist context. How does gender influence militancy in migration? And how do political commitment and migration influence gender relations and the construction of femininity and masculinity?

Our perspective is to consider gender as a central organising principle of migratory flows and the lives of migrants (Mahler and Pessar, 2006). Gender influences where, how and why people migrate, and how they fit into the host society (Morokvasic, 1991; Donato et al, 2006; Pessar and Mahler, 2003; Mahieu et al, 2009; Lutz, 2010). The influence of migration - understood as an engine of socio-cultural change - on gender relations has also been widely demonstrated (Hondagneu-Sotelo, 2003; Parado and Flippen, 2005): it sometimes leads to empowerment, and sometimes to an accentuation of female subordination (Piper, 2005; Foner, 2001; Dahinden et al., 2007). From this perspective, the conference will look at social relations as expressions of inequality, domination and power, considering that gender relations are always mediated by other socially constructed categories, such as "race", ethnicity, social class or nationality (Anthias and Yuval Davis, 1992, Phoenix and Pattynama, 2006).

Particular attention will be paid to the question of agency –political agency and migratory agency - a concept that is central to new research on the history of exiled women engaged in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (Maugendre, 2019; Lo Biodo, 2013; André, 2016). Indeed, women have often been seen as following in men's footsteps or migrating as a result of family decisions (Kofman, 1999) and, as such, without agency, without mobilising their own networks or shaping their own destinies (Harzig 2001). Yet research shows that they are not blindly subject to structural factors, but play an active role in the design of the migration project, the decision to migrate, the organisation of the journey, participation in networks and in the society of arrival (Timmerman, 2015, 235-243). However, attention to women's active role should not lead to overlook the specific vulnerability of migrant women (Nouvelles Questions Féministes, 2006). For this reason, agency is also often interpreted in the sense of adaptation: how do women adapt to opportunities and constraints, how do they give meaning to their migratory trajectory? The concept of agency is also fruitful for thinking about the collective commitments of immigrant women (Veith, 1999). Migrant women's involvement in associations can be analysed as a strategy for empowerment and resistance to insecurity (Lesselier, 2003), and migrant women can be portrayed as "resilient, strategic and in search of autonomy" (Schmoll, 2020, cited by Guerry, 2020).

Topics

Three axes have been defined, in order to consider the multiple social and spatial scales on which gender operates simultaneously across transnational terrains (Pessar and Mahler, 2003):

  • Axis 1: micro level: activism in migration and negotiating gender boundaries: This axis looks at the forms of women's political commitment and the gendered distribution of activist work in the context of migration. It examines the porous nature of politics and intimacy, and the intersections between commitment, community life, public life and private life. How are care responsibilities negotiated within militant families? What are the continuities and discontinuities in activist careers over the course of migration, and how are relationships with the country of origin negotiated? Particular attention will be paid to the effects of commitment and migration on bodies, and on the gendered agency of migrant activists.
  • Axis 2: meso level: networks, sociabilities and activist movements : This axis looks at gender relations within activist, political and/or community networks, and the issues involved in the gender (non-)mixity of organisations. What impact does the gender of activists have on their sociability and networks in their countries of arrival and origin? This axis also looks at gender relations within transnational activist networks, internationalism and mobility as a modality of political commitment - and their implications in terms of gender.
  • Axis 3: macro level: institutional views, normative views, representations, and their consequences on people's lives: This axis looks at the gender dimension in the discourse and representations of activism in exile: moralisation, repression, stigmatisation, invisibilisation, etc. It looks at the representations (in the press or literature) and police apprehensions of the political commitment of exiled women and men. How are migrant women recognised as active political subjects? What impact does this have on their daily lives and their commitments? Some research, for example, has highlighted how the invisibility of women activists can also be a resource: they are less distrusted by the authorities, opening up a number of possibilities for action (Durant, Dupont and Diaz, 2021)...
Submission guidelines

Proposals (300 words) should be sent with a short biography to migrationhistory2024@ulb.be

by 15 March 2024

Notification of acceptance will be sent no later than 8 April 2024.

  • The symposium is organised in collaboration with the the Forum for Belgian research on history of women, gender and sexuality (AVG-CARHIF) and the BRAIN (BELSPO) project WomenExile: Gendering Political Exile in Belgium (1918-1958) jointly supported by the National Archives of Belgium, the Université libre de Bruxelles and the Universiteit Antwerpen.
  • The day will be held at the National Archives of Belgium (2 rue de Ruysbroek, 1000 Brussels) on 24 September 2024. Presentations will be given in English.
Publication

The conference proceedings will be published in a special issue of the journal Sextant (2025) by Éditions de l'Université de Bruxelles (https://www.editions-ulb.be/fr/review/?collection_ID=8). Articles may be written in French or English, as Sextant is a bilingual journal. The first version of the articles will be submitted for peer-review in early 2025.

Organising Committee
  • Michaël Amara (NAB)
  • Henk de Smaele (UAntwerpen)
  • Juliette Masquelier (ULB/UAntwerpen)
  • Aline Thomas (NAB)
  • Cécile Vanderpelen (ULB)
Scientific Committee
  • Michaël Amara (NAB)
  • Henk de Smaele (UAntwerpen)
  • Asunción Fresnoza-Flot (ULB)
  • Hilde Greefs (UAntwerpen)
  • Juliette Masquelier (ULB/UAntwerpen)
  • Aline Thomas (NAB)
  • Cécile Vanderpelen (ULB)

Labour History Review postgraduate essay prize 2024

1 week 1 day ago

Submissions are now open for the Labour History Review postgraduate essay prize 2024. The competition is open to anyone currently registered for a higher research degree, in Britain or abroad, or to anyone who completed such a degree within the timeframe set out in the rules.

Download the entry form and rules >

The cash prize for this year’s winner has been substantially increased by the Society for the Study of Labour History, and now stands at £700. In addition, the winning essay will be published in Labour History Review, and the winner will receive a year’s free membership of the Society for the Study of Labour History, which includes a subscription to Labour History Review.

Other entries of sufficient quality may be invited to publish their submissions in the journal. If so, then they will be given one year’s free subscription to Labour History Review.

Essays can be on any topic of labour history broadly defined, provided that they fulfil the requirements of the editorial statement/aims and scope of Labour History Review, as set out in the entry form. Essays should conform to LHR style guidelines, copies of which can be found on the websites of the SSLH (Guidelines for authors) and Liverpool University Press.

Essays for the 2024 competition must be submitted no later than 31 March 2024.

Download the entry form and rules >

Read about the winners of the Labour History Review Essay Prize 2023 >

Best wishes,

On behalf of Liverpool University Press

Natasha Bikkul (she/her/hers)

nbikkul@liverpool.ac.uk

Journals Marketing Manager 

CfP: Class Conflict and Institutional Change

1 week 3 days ago

Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies (MPIfG) in Cologne, 13-15 November 2024

Conference theme

Employing the lens of the life and work of Otto Kahn-Freund (1900–1979), we investigate the invention of labor law as a distinct field of legal doctrine and scholarship. Invention and reinvention are understood here to be ongoing political and scholarly processes, involving the defense of existing institutions and the development of new ones. We consider developments across the twentieth century, from the end of the first world war to the struggle over the second postwar settlement in the 1970s and thereafter. Following Kahn-Freund, we conceive of labor law scholarship as an interdisciplinary endeavor, combining insights from political economy, sociology of law, and empirically-oriented industrial relations. As such, our investigation allows us to address two questions: How was legal scholarship on the changing conflict between capital and labor related to contemporary developments in the social sciences, and what can we learn from this today?

We invite paper proposals which address the conference theme.  In particular, authors may wish to address the following:

  • The relations and interactions of labor law scholars and trade unionists in the Weimar Republic
  • The reception of Karl Marx and Max Weber in Weimar labor law scholarship and, especially, the work of Otto Kahn-Freund
  • Labor law and the state under capitalism: from Heller and Neumann to Laski and Miliband
  • Labor law and corporatism: the legal empowerment and control of trade unions through the institutionalization of trade union rights; delegated rights and imposed restriction; Keynes to Marshall to Donovan – Keynesian full employment – incomes policy in the 1970s and its failure
  • Labor law and comparative political economy: the origins and significance of commonality and difference.

Venue

The Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies (MPIfG) is located in Cologne, Germany. It is one of the largest social science research institutions in Germany, regarded internationally as one of the top research institutes in the social sciences. Cologne has its own airport and can be easily reached by train from Frankfurt International Airport, Düsseldorf airport, and other locations throughout mainland Europe.

Confirmed speakers

  • Zoe Adams, University of Cambridge
  • Ruth Dukes, University of Glasgow
  • Richard Hyman, London School of Economics
  • Agustín José Menéndez, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
  • Brishen Rogers, Georgetown University
  • William Scheuerman, Indiana University
  • Wolfgang Streeck, MPIfG
  • Rebecca Zahn, University of Strathclyde

Submissions

Scholars who are interested in presenting papers at the conference are invited to submit an abstract of up to 500 words. Please include a title, your name and affiliation, and contact information.

Abstracts should be sent to Ruth Dukes by April 30, 2024. Please copy the following text into the title of the email: Class Conflict and Institutional Change Paper Proposal. Decisions on the acceptance of paper proposals will be communicated by May 31, 2024.

Logistics and key dates

We are grateful for the financial and administrative support provided by the MPIfG. Thanks to that support, no fee will be charged for attendance at the conference, but participants may be asked to cover their own travel and accommodation expenses. Information about recommended hotels will be provided at a later date.

  • April 30, 2024: Last day to submit paper proposals
  • May 31, 2024: Decisions on acceptance of paper proposals
  • November 13–15, 2024: Conference in Cologne

Any questions can be addressed to Ruth Dukes.

CfP: Exploring the Atlantic and Asian Dutch Empire and its Archives: actor-centered and gender approaches (17th-19th Century)

1 week 3 days ago

Workshop Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies & International In-stitute of Social History Amsterdam
Dates: 20-21 June 2024
Place: Conference room, Niebuhrstr. 5, 53113 Bonn
Organizers: Eva Marie Lehner (BCDSS) and Hanna te Velde (IISH)

In the past years, the lives of colonized people have been studied increasingly. Individual stories of enslaved, freed and other marginalized men and women were documented in colonial ar-chives, often because they stepped out of line at a certain moment. How to find a more balanced approach when trying to unearth the lives of colonized people, while being at the mercy of colonial archives? How to best account for the manifold differences between men and women living in colonial establishments, based among others on gender, race, class, religion, age and social position? This workshop wants to provide a platform for Ph.D. candidates and postdoc-toral researchers to address the above challenges, showcase their individual research projects, obtain comments from experts in gender history, slavery studies, and Dutch colonial history, and stimulate exchanges and discussions.
In this workshop, professor Claudia Jarzebowski (early modern history and dependency studies, BCDSS), and professor Sarah Zimmermann (colonialism and gender, Western Washington University) together with Dutch and German Ph.D. and postdoctoral researchers will explore the Atlantic and Asian Dutch Empire and its archives (17th-19th century) from different levels and from various perspectives. First, we aim to encourage a dialogue between researchers who take a global approach to the Dutch Empire, using, for example, sources of the Dutch trading companies, and researchers who use a case-centered approach, concentrating on specific colo-nial outposts and situations, individual actors and including different types of archives and sources. Second, we want to explore different approaches to studying previously underexposed historical actors, such as European women, enslaved individuals, indigenous women, or chil-dren and offspring of mixed marriages and relationships. Consequently, our goal is to develop a comparative framework rooted in a focus on historical actors and gender perspectives rather than top-down abstract entities like colonies or colonial archives. This approach is particularly beneficial for slavery and dependency studies, because it encompasses a wide spectrum of power dynamics and dependencies, instead of emphasizing binaries like colonizers and colo-nized, free and unfree.

Provisional programme

We will start at circa 1.30 pm on Tuesday June 20, and the workshop will be finished Friday June 21 around 15.00 pm.

Assignments and assessment

By exploring the above topics from an actor-/bottom-up approach and gender perspective, the workshop will address the following questions:
1. How were men and women treated differently in the Dutch early modern empire, and what was the role of socio-economic aspects (for example religion, race, status, age, background, marital status, free/unfree status) in the making of these differences?
2. To what extent were various women and other marginalized actors able to have an impact on their direct environments and the broader colonial societies they were a part of?
3. How were differences between the Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds reflected in the lives of the people living in Dutch colonial establishments?
4. What can we learn from a global perspective that compares the Dutch Empire with other Empires?
5. How can colonial sources be used to study women, marginalized or so-called “invisible” actors from a bottom-up perspective?
All workshop participants are asked to hand in short papers (3000-5000 words), based on their ongoing research, addressing one or more of the above questions before 1 June 2024. Partici-pants are required to read the papers of all fellow participants. Short presentations at the work-shop and comments prepared by experts in gender history, slavery studies and the Dutch colo-nial empire will facilitate in-depth feedback for each participant and discussions that bridge the different topics, approaches, and results.

Application

Please register before March 23 by contacting Hanna te Velde (hanna.te.velde@iisg.nl) and Eva Marie Lehner (elehner@uni-bonn.de), and include a short abstract of your paper (100-500 words). Do not hesitate to reach out in case of further questions.

CfP: “Crossroads of Resistance”

1 week 3 days ago

Southern Labor Studies Association
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
September 20-21, 2024
Submission Deadline: March 15, 2024

In 2024 SLSA will convene in Chattanooga at a pivotal moment for Southern workers, a
crossroads between rising reaction and potential for radical change. The combination of
Chattanooga’s history as a strategic transportation junction and a locus of Southern labor
resistance inspires our conference theme of “Crossroads of Resistance.”

At this site of convergence and departure, SLSA seeks explorations of geographical,
generational, and organizational exchanges in the lives of Southern working people—past,
present, and future. SLSA’s mission is to bring together a broad, diverse array of scholars,
thinkers, organizers, and other activists working at the crossroads of academic disciplines and
beyond the ivory tower, including dialogues among folks in the labor movement, community
organizing, journalism, and the arts. We welcome scholars whose work engages many Souths–
Black, white, people of color, Indigenous, Queer, and recent migrants.

We invite proposals in a wide range of formats, including traditional paper presentation
sessions, individual papers, roundtable discussions, workshops, skillshares, and other
nontraditional formats. In addition to our customary program, we are excited to announce our
“New Directions” Workshop Series on the morning of Friday, September 20, in which
graduate students and early career scholars can pre-circulate article-length essays and engage
in focused seminar discussions in small groups. Presenters in this category will also be
considered for the SLSA Robert H. Zieger Prize as well as conference travel grants for early
career participants, all of which will be announced at the conference.

Most conference activities will take place on the campus of the University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga (UTC), located just blocks from the Tennessee Riverwalk, the Bluff View Art
District, downtown restaurants, and historic MLK Blvd. The Guerry Center, home to UTC’s
Honors College, will host breakout sessions, film screenings, and performances, and attendees
will convene for a plenary and reception at the university’s newly renovated Fine Arts Center.
Discounted hotel accommodations will be available at Chattanooga’s historic Read House,
where we will gather for a buffet dinner and keynote address. Known as the Scenic City,
Chattanooga offers conference attendees opportunities to hike, bike, kayak, and rock climb, as
well as abundant restaurants, breweries, shops, and historic sites.

To submit a full session or individual proposal, visit https://bit.ly/SLSA2024. Questions? Email
SouthernLaborStudies2024@gmail.com or contact a member of the conference committee
listed below.

Submission Deadline: March 15, 2024

 

Special Thanks to our Sponsors!

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
University of New Orleans
Texas A&M University
Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA)
University of Georgia
and more - email us to ask how!

SLSA Conference Committee

Thomas J. Adams, University of South Alabama
Thomas Alter II, Texas State University
Shannon C. Eaves, College of Charleston
Sarah Fouts, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Joshua Hollands, University College London
Justin Jolly, Texas Christian University
Robert Korstad, Duke University
Max Krochmal, University of New Orleans
Sarah McNamara, Texas A&M University
Iliana Yamileth Rodriguez, Emory University
Jarod Roll, University of Mississippi
Bryant Simon, Temple University
Jermaine Thibodeaux,University of Oklahoma
Michael D. Thompson, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Additional Notes on the Conference Theme

We invite participants to riff on our theme of “Crossroads of Resistance,” building upon and
beyond the following dimensions:

● Temporal crossroads (then and now/future)
● The crossroads of disciplines and subfields
● Geographic crossroads within the region and beyond it (transnational, etc.)
● Intergenerational crossroads
● Crossroads in forms of organizing, between formal labor organizations and new models
● The present as a crossroads between fascism and resistance
● Crossroads of scholarship and activism
● Crossroads of labor systems and types of work (from enslavement to the gig economy)
and/or imagining futures of guaranteed incomes or without work
● Crossroads of work, academic freedom, and the donor class in higher education

CfP: Annual Chartism Day

2 weeks 1 day ago

University of Reading 7 September 2024

The annual Chartism Day Conferences were launched at the University of Birmingham in September 1995 by the renowned Chartist historian Dorothy Thompson (1923-2011). Apart from the disruption caused by the Covid pandemic, the conferences, which are endorsed by the Society for the Study of Labour History [SSLH], have been held in a variety of locations in England, Wales, Ireland and France every year since, bringing together established academics, postgraduate researchers and members of the public who all share a common interest in the history of the Chartist movement. As well as a strong contingent of labour historians, Chartism Day brings together a broad spectrum of academics from the diverse fields of arts and humanities. It is this dynamic interchange between scholars working in an interdisciplinary environment that gives the event its distinctively friendly and productive character. 

Our next conference will be held at the University of Reading, hosted by Professor David Stack and themed to commemorate Dorothy Thompson’s impressive scholarship. Although we are inviting proposals on any aspect of Chartism, we would particularly welcome papers which closely engage with Dorothy’s special interests. Proposals might usefully focus on

•​Radicalism and political reform

•​Class and Chartism

•​Gender and women’s participation in Chartism

•​The Irish dimension 

•​Feargus O’Connor /Chartist leadership

•​The Land Plan

Presenters can choose to deliver full length (30-45 mins) or shorter papers (15 mins). Shorter papers could also be a contribution to our regular ‘Chartist Lives’ feature which offers brief biographical sketches of lesser-known Chartists, or be an analysis of a related document or artefact. 

In all instances, we are calling for brief abstracts of no more than around 350 words to be submitted by 19 April 2024. 

Please send abstracts to the co-convenors

Joan Allen joan.allen@ncl.ac.uk &

Richard Allen richard.allen@ncl.ac.uk

Further information: https://sslh.org.uk/2024/02/08/chartism-day-2024/

CfP: Workshop and Special Issue: Cold War Internationalisms of/in the Decolonizing World

2 weeks 1 day ago

Workshop at Geneva Graduate Institute, 5-6 June 2024

The Global Sixties: An Interdisciplinary Journal invites submissions for a workshop and an ensuing special thematic issue on Internationalism of the Decolonizing World in the Cold War.

In recent decades, Cold War historiography has paid growing attention to the autonomy and agency of the players beyond the US-Soviet dichotomy. In the wake of Westad’s seminal The Global Cold War (2005), scholars have increasingly explored the episodes, events, and institutions that demonstrate the agency of the Global South. From the Bandung Conference to Pan-African networks, the so-called Third World assumes a pivotal role in the latest historiographies. Newly independent states, among others, are recast as actors in their own right and not mere pawns in a game played by two superpowers.

Cold War Internationalisms of/in the Decolonizing World advances this recentering of the narrative by focusing on decolonizing or newly independent states, along with related actors, as the makers and breakers of the Cold War world order. This special issue thus seeks to reframe the Cold War from the standpoint of Latin American, Middle Eastern, African, or Asian actors – where the US and Soviet Union appear not as the protagonists but as the dependent variables of decolonial world-making.

In addition, we seek contributions to highlight the decolonizing world’s agency in defining and/or shaping various ideologies – including, but not limited to, Communism, Socialism, Social Democracy, Nationalism, or Liberalism. We want to explore how actors from the postcolonial sphere assigned new meanings to the political vocabulary of the Cold War and created their own vocabularies.

Submissions including, but not limited to, the following topics are welcome:

    Anti-imperialist networks

    South-south diplomacies

    Biographical or multi-biographical studies

    Revolutionary organizations linked to post-colonial powers

    Women’s organizations, labor, intellectual, cultural, medical, educational, and humanitarian groups

    Politics of anti-colonial nationalism

    Non-Soviet communisms

 

 International repercussions and transnational afterlives of novel variations of ideologies or stand-alone ideologies emerging from the decolonizing world (Maoism, Nasserism, Juche, Jamahiriyya, Latin American Developmentalism, Nkruhmaism, Nehruvianism, etc.)

 Contributions from all levels, including graduate students and independent scholars, are greatly encouraged.

 

How to Apply

Prospective authors should send a short abstract (300 words) and a short bio (one paragraph) directly to Burak Sayim (burak.sayim@nyu.edu) and Severyan Dyakonov (sd3196@nyu.edu) by March 30, 2024. We will be in touch about the results by April 15.

The workshop will take place on June 5-6, 2024 at Geneva Graduate Institute. Financial support for travel and accommodation is limited.

If you are invited to submit a paper for the envisioned publication afterwards, the submission deadline for a completed manuscript is October 30, 2024.

For submission, style guidelines, or any further information, click here: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rsix21&…

CfP: Iron Curtains or Artistic Gates? Communism and Cultural Diplomacy in the Global South (1945–1991 and Beyond)

3 weeks 2 days ago

University of Vienna, 19-20 September 2024

Iron Curtains or Artistic Gates? Communism and Cultural Diplomacy in the Global South (1945–1991 and Beyond)

How did cultural interaction since 1945 unfold outside the realm of Western dominance, shaping omitted global narratives? This workshop will explore cultural interactions between state socialist countries in Europe and those in the Global South, with the aim of challenging and deconstructing traditional Cold War narratives.

Iron Curtains or Artistic Gates? Communism and Cultural Diplomacy in the Global South (1945–1991 and Beyond)

How did cultural interaction since 1945 unfold outside the realm of Western dominance, shaping omitted global narratives? While Cold War studies have long acknowledged the role of culture and the arts as instrument of „soft power,“ scholars have traditionally framed this role within a binary East-West narrative. More recent studies have highlighted the necessity of a complex, interconnected, and global view of this conflict, with a particular focus on the decolonization process. This workshop will explore cultural interactions between state socialist countries in Europe and those in the Global South, with the aim of challenging and deconstructing traditional Cold War narratives.

We seek to further analyze the specificities, similarities, and differences in the development of relations between the Global South and state socialist Europe. Although these issues have been increasingly discussed in the context of trade, labor, and education, they have not yet received sufficient attention in the realm of visual arts, material objects, and cultural institutions. We welcome contributions from Central, South-Eastern, and Eastern European, as well as especially the Global South perspectives. Our goal is to foster critical discussion of theoretical frameworks as well as illustrative case studies that emphasize the historical and contemporary diversity and specificity of these regions by avoiding their objectification and homogenization.

We invite submissions for 20-minute papers from across the fields of museology and cultural heritage studies; art, architecture, cultural, global, oral, and Cold War histories; and political science that focus on:

- Cultural relations, representations, imaginations, and their historical and political contexts;
- Roles and impacts of cultural institutions, programs, exhibitions, and objects in the (un)official cultural diplomacy;
- Mobilities and exchanges of artists, cultural workers, artworks, artifacts, and ideas across regions and continents;
- Networks between official policies, institutions, and individuals in shaping and implementing cultural diplomacy;
- Relationship between art markets, role of collectors in shaping state cultural policy, and surrounding issues of provenance;
- Actors, motivations, and backgrounds of cultural encounters, and their evolution from economic to ideological interests;
- Role of European state socialist states in cultural decolonization and anti-imperialist partnerships;
- Historical transcontinental power dynamics and inequalities in cultural relations and diplomacy;Colonial legacies and challenges in contemporary cultural institutions and curatorial practices.

Keynote Lecture: Prof Beáta Hock (Leibniz Institute for the History and Culture of Eastern Europe; Humboldt University of Berlin)

Please submit an abstract (c. 250 words) and a brief bio to anna-marie.kroupova@univie.ac.at by 31 March 2024. Applicants selected by the scientific committee will be notified by 30 April 2024.

Scientific Committee: Friedrich Cain (University of Vienna), Noémie Étienne (University of Vienna), Beáta Hock (Leibniz Institute for the History and Culture of Eastern Europe; Humboldt University of Berlin), Dietlind Hüchtker (University of Vienna), Anna-Marie Kroupová (University of Vienna)

Workshop Partners: Faculty Center for Transdisciplinary Historical and Cultural Studies (University of Vienna), FSP Global History (University of Vienna), Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Research on the Consequences of War, New Cold War Studies Research Group (University of Vienna), Research platform "Transformations and Eastern Europe" (University of Vienna)

Kontakt

anna-marie.kroupova@univie.ac.at

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